Details in Quarantine

a story told thru photos captured by Kimberly Harris @kiimberlyharris, feature photo assembled by Isaac Morris

Weed and Western Animation

written and illustrated by Renee Thompson

For me, the relationship between weed and animation has always been clear.

Although it goes unspoken, it is apparently a familial tradition to smoke weed and watch cartoons. First, my grandfather watching Looney Tunes on Saturday mornings in the 60’s, and then there’s present-day me: smoking a bong in the wee hours of the morning watching Ranma ½. There is a certain wonder and magic about animation, about seeing art come to life. It exposes you to different perspectives, and perhaps because people don’t take it as seriously, there is more room to explore the world of cannabis. Animation is relaxing, beautiful, and more often than not, it’s funny. This stellar combination makes watching animation the perfect companion to a cozy night in with a joint (or three).

When cannabis is ingested, perception is altered in many possible ways. While every person reacts to cannabis differently, as well as having varied responses to various strains, most people do report heightened focus abilities and other changes in their senses. Spanish vision researchers at the University of Granada in 2021 found that cannabis use does affect vision, and the participants of the Effects of cannabis on visual function and self-perceived visual quality study reported seeing halos and other small visual distortions. As someone who watches animation both sober and high, I have noticed slight color, hue, and shade changes as well as small light halos which do slightly alter the works while being under the influence. For most cannabis consumers giddiness, hunger, and fatigue are common side effects to consumption that go well together with watching a funny cartoon and eating your favorite munchies.

After consuming animated works for some time, one begins to notice repeated symbols, metaphors, and other coded language that is used to bring cannabis into the audience’s mind. In adult animated T.V. series, like The Simpsons, Family Guy, American Dad, and South Park, references to cannabis, like South Park’s Towelie, are in-your-face even if they were produced when cannabis use was illegal in the U.S. Characters in these types of shows can be seen purchasing cannabis from dealers, consuming cannabis, and may even have a designated stoner character. In some cases, watching these types of shows were many people’s first encounter with cannabis related concepts and rituals. I feel that animation is also largely affected by the creatives that make them, and since cannabis has been known to alter creativity, it makes sense that artists who may use cannabis would slip in these references into the art they make. Even though animators like Adventure Time’s Pendleton Ward, Steven Universe’s Rebecca Sugar, and Gravity Fall’s Alex Hirsch have been speculated by fans as cannabis users, none of them have ever made any public comments about using cannabis. 

Animation made after cannabis legalization in America, like Midnight Gospel, seem to be moving away from more joke-like cannabis use and focus on real conversations embedded in the dialogue. Midnight Gospel opens with cannabis activists being eaten by zombies as the main character, Clancy, interviews the President of the United States, played by Dr. Drew Pinsky, an addiction medicine specialist, about the pros and cons of drugs. Together, the characters have an in-depth conversation about sensations, experiences and research related to psychedelics. The animated fictitious tale combined with real interviews created a new type of storytelling that I had never seen before.

Animated films on the other hand, are not as cannabis-friendly as adult animated T.V. series. Most likely due to the fact that a majority are made for children. However, there are some exceptions. In the animated film Persepolis, a film based on the autobiographical comic The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, Marjane recounts her use of cannabis as a way to forget about the troubles she left in war-torn Iran and connect with her new friends in Europe. In the film, which was made in France,  you see Marjane buying cannabis, consuming cannabis, and reflecting on her own use of the substance. Whether displayed as exaggerated use, as shown in shows like American Dad with the golden blunt, or a more realistic use as seen in Persepolis, adult animation is where you see the bulk of cannabis references and use.

 As for non-adult animation, references are more hidden. In season 4 of Hey Arnold!, Arnold’s grandpa insists he cannot go back to school because he, “lost too many brain cells,” and insinuates Woodstock for being partially responsible. There are also more blatant references in shows like Bob’s Burgers, which is rated 13+, but also shows the Belcher children working on an illegal weed farm and selling weed to other characters. In the realm of advertising, the partially animated Expensify commercial featuring rapper 2 Chainz, which aired during Super Bowl LIII in 2019, shows a scene where the musician helps the reindeer he is riding smoke out of a bong. In that same Super Bowl, an Acreage commercial calling for medicinal cannabis legalization was blocked from airing.

There is something extremely nostalgic about cartoons, animated films, and anime that reminds me of simpler times. Even though the days of walking to Blockbuster video to get the latest Studio Ghibli movie are over, animation has never been more accessible. Today’s streaming services offer thousands of choices, and one could watch animated works for years without watching anything twice. Animation has always been a stage to talk about real life, as distorted as some of the creations are. This is also one of the few mediums that has been able to implement cannabis culture, possibly because of the artists behind the animated works and/or the audiences that consume them. I hypothesize that as cannabis consumption becomes more normalized, we will continue to see realistic, and perhaps less humorous, cannabis use in animation. 

For those that are looking for some recommendations, here are some of my favorite animated T.V. shows and movies not yet mentioned in this article. Most of these titles are available on streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, or HBO Max, but you could also find some of these works at your local library.

Movies:

         1. The Secret of Kells, 2009

         2. My High School Sinking Into The Sea, 2016*

         3. Loving Vincent, 2017

         4. Disney’s Fantasia, both 1999 and 2000 versions

         5. Chico and Rita, 2010*

T.V. Shows:

         1. Bee and Puppycat, 2013

         2. Daria, 1997*

         3. Tuca & Birdie, 2019*

         4. Disenchantment, 2018*

         5. Brad Neely’s Harg Nallin’ Sclopio Peepio, 2016*

*Related to cannabis, or has cannabis references. 

Strain of The Month: Forbidden Fruit

 written and photographed by Renee Thompson

There’s just something special about having purple flower. I don’t come into contact with it a lot, but it’s nice every once and a while to treat yourself to something different. Having an inclination to the more fruity flavor profiles, when I saw Forbidden Fruit at the dispensary, I knew I just had to have it. A cross of Tangie and Cherry Pie, this indica works great in a joint, blunt, pipe, or bong. Technically purple flower, whose color is produced with the help of anthocyanins, Forbidden Fruit is more of a mixture of dark purple and dark green accented with orange pistils, which look like little hairs or whiskers. Fun fact: anthocyanins are also responsible for the color of blueberries.

The Forbidden Fruit I sampled this month was purchased at Lucky Lion, located at 2164 W. 7th Ave. in Eugene. I personally have had nothing but great experiences with this location, the budtenders are always so helpful and kind to me. I feel that I have been extremely lucky with my timing, as I have been the only customer in the shop on a handful of occasions. Perhaps it is the steep construction of the parking lot, or the location of the shop altogether, that has kept this dispensary under the radar, but I have always found that these hole-in-the-wall dispensaries give the best service. The general layout and decoration of the shop is nice, it reminds me of visiting a rich friend’s basement. If we were not in a pandemic, Lucky Lion would be a place where one could hang out for a bit or admire the flower buds on Greek-style pedestals.

The key side effects I experienced while using Forbidden Fruit were relaxation, creativity and euphoria. If you identify as a creative-type, I strongly recommend trying Forbidden Fruit. Unlike some indicas, this strain did not put me in-dah-couch. I felt very much like cleaning, organizing and creating. While smoking this strain, out of a bong mostly, I took on to cleaning and seasoning cast irons—which is a tedious chore if you use them as much as I do. I also started to art journaling more, an activity that worked well with this strain.

While smoking Forbidden Fruit, I didn’t feel like I was using more than I usually do, even though I have been stressed out lately. The Forbidden Fruit flavor profile lives up to its name. Fruity, specifically that of tart blackberries and sweet blueberries, is the first and strongest flavor. There is also a certain tea-like or earthy flavor. If you do smoke through quite a bit of this strain, or another purple strain, you’ll find that your kief catch will be decorated in dark purple dust. Overall I would rate Forbidden Fruit a 10/10, and according to Leafly it is still available at Lucky Lion.

Niche in the Neighborhood

written and photographed by Annie McVay, with additional photos provided from the Oregon Historical Society and Lane County History Museum

Have you ever wondered about the history behind the building a dispensary occupies? Featured below are two local dispensaries with rich background stories you may not have heard before. If any readers out there know of any others, please share them with us @greeneugenemag!

Jamaica Joel’s – 37 W. 13th Ave. Suite 201

photo provided by Lane County History Museum

The building Jamaica Joel’s occupies has a genuinely unique Art Moderne and International Style architecture, popular in the post-war era. The use of aluminum railings, curves, and reinforced concrete may remind you of similar building characteristics from the Fallout video game series. According to the University of Washington’s Pacific Coast Architecture Database, the building design was the first independent commission done by Harry Robert Wilmsen, a local Eugene Architect. Earnest W. Ellis started his photography business in 1920 and requested the commission from Wilmsen. Ellis moved his studio there once construction was finished in 1947.   

Ellis owned the building until he passed away in 1976. Thankfully, Kennell Ellis Photography continues to live on today. The plethora of photos of the building from the 40s exists today precisely because of the Kennell Ellis studio. Upstairs, there was Gredvig Beauty Studio and the Kennell Ellis Photography Studio. Below was Morse’s Women’s Wear, which must have realized how much the curved glass display window added to the elegance of their women’s clothing. The striking Kennell Ellis neon sign continues to decorate the building today.

Locally owned and operated, Jamaica Joel’s truly is a dispensary for the people. Before COVID-19 put a halt on public events, the dispensary even hosted “Joel’s Jams” and featured independent hip-hop artists such as Zion I. Using the dispensary as a venue to spread creativity, art and ideas for the people is something we all hope to see again in the future! Remember to support your local dispensary so they make it through these tough times. 

Cannabliss & Co The Sorority House – 588 E. 11th Ave

photo provided by Lane County History Museum

The Sorority House was built in 1902 for the historically well-known banker, attorney, and State Legislator Windsor W. Calkins. Given the distinctive Queen Anne Style architecture and prime location, the Calkins house is surely as hard to miss these days as it was back then. The fanciful conical-roofed corner tower, wrap-around open-air covered porch, stained glass window panes, and the plethora of ornate interior woodwork are all staples of the Victorian Era architectural style. The Queen Anne Style was popular from 1880 to the early 1900s. Windsor, following family tradition, modeled the design off his childhood home in northern Minnesota. The Calkins family never could have guessed what a delightful dispensary their home would become!   

Way before Green Eugene took an interest in this dispensary’s rich history, another student from the University of Oregon had acknowledged the home’s unique value. Kimberly Goddard, at the time a graduate student at the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, prepared the form to have the Calkins house registered nationally. Previously, Eugene citizens voted on keeping the house in the community using  taxpayer money, but the measure failed. Then in 1976, the home was titled a City of Eugene Historical Landmark. Thanks to Goddard, on December 9th, 1981, it was published in the National Register of Historic Places. The Calkins house is one of the last of the elegant homes from this historical period, even outliving the famed Patterson house featured in Animal House.

While the official documents state the Calkins house site was acquired through part of Hillyard Shaw’s first donation of land to Eugene in the 1860s, it is essential to acknowledge this land first belonged to various Indigenous Peoples. Earlier agreements in the 1850s made by the Congress-appointed Willamette Valley Treaty Commission did not end with any Indigenous Peoples agreeing to leave the valley. Unfortunately, these agreements were not ratified because they did not make the tribes relocate East of the Cascades. By January 1855, after constant encroachment, harassment, and diseases brought by American settlers, the Indigenous Peoples signed the Kalapuya Treaty (also known as the Willamette Valley treaty). The Kalapuya, the Clackamas Chinook, and the Molala peoples were removed by force from the Willamette Valley during the following winter.   

In 1886, the property passed from Robert Scott to Mary Scott, who then sold the land to Windsor Calkins on April 17th, 1902. The house continued to stay in the family after Calkins died in 1945, leaving the property to his daughter, Jeannette. In 1975, Thomas and Nelly Link and Anne Kimball bought the house, saving it from otherwise slated demolition. The new owners began many restoration efforts, such as fixing the foundation, porch, siding, roof and replacing support beams plagued with dry rot. The original hardware found in the house was also reused, and missing pieces were replaced with vintage hardware from the period. They later opened the Calkins house as a bed and breakfast, which required few alterations to the building’s authenticity.  

Cannabliss & Co acquired the property in 2016 and dubbed this new location ‘The Sorority House.’ Besides the sign in the spacious and sprawling front yard, many would think it was just that, especially given its prime location near the University of Oregon campus. Cannabliss & Co did an exceptional job in this first year of business, impressing so many customers that The Sorority House took first place for best dispensary in Emerald Media Group’s 2017 Best of Campus. The Emerald Essentials article featuring this accomplishment by Delaney Rea noted how knowledgeable the budtenders were and the wide selection of products – both of which are still true today!  

High Recommendations: 42° Farms Remedy Hemp Balm

written and photographed by Skyla Patton

They say that you can tell a lot about a person by the contents of what they carry in their bag. I think this is a true statement to a certain extent, but I’d take it a little further: you can tell a lot about how a person takes care of themselves by what they carry in their bag. Whether it’s an army of chapstick, hand sanitizer galore or a total lack thereof, our care-regimen superstars are revealed by whether or not we can leave the house without them. For example, if you were to dig through my old canvas backpack, you’d get a good whiff of OG-something-or-other (and disregard the alarming amount of empty Tums rolls while you’re at it). But as of late, I have a new all-star in my lineup that has saved the day when it comes to self-care and pain management on the go: let me introduce you to 42° Remedy Hemp Balm. 

Turned on to me by a close friend and fellow cannabis-enthusiast, this CBD-packed balm is crafted from the best savory ingredients, like beeswax and coconut oil, along with a perfect blend of peppermint essential oil to soothe the muscles and awaken your senses. The hemp extract used is grown in the heart of Southern Oregon, just outside of Ashland, and the effectiveness of the product tells the story of the hardworking hands and love that went into the plants. My personal favorite is the travel-size 2oz tin, which fits conveniently into any of my backpacks, pockets or purses, and is loaded with a whopping 375mg of CBD. 

As someone who is a regular consumer of both THC and CBD products (with what is sometimes a disturbingly high tolerance) I have to give this product the shout out that it deserves in packing a serious punch when it comes to pain relief. Depending on the area and genre of pain, I’ve found relief with this product that can act as fast as just a few minutes beyond application and popping it back into my bag. Because of the way that CBD and CBG products are regulated, it can be easy for less-than-quality products to slip through the cracks and onto the shelves, and even easier for unsuspecting consumers to spend insane amounts of cash on duds. 42° Farms conducts third-party testing to ensure consistency and safety for all of their products, as well as making their balms in smaller quantities to focus on the quality (and love) in each batch. Curious about the details? Test results are posted with each product on their website for your review. 

This balm is fast-acting and provides an added layer of immediate comfort with the soothing peppermint scent (a personal favorite for headache relief as well) and smooth, silky texture. Unlike other topicals I’ve tried in the past, this product leaves no sticky or greasy residue behind and melts into your skin like butter after just a few moments of massaging it in. Sensitive-skin approved, this moisturizing balm is cool to the touch and a little goes a long way so the smaller travel size is plenty for most occasions—although as a self-admitted CBD junkie, the next size up to 750mg doesn’t look half bad either. The 2oz travel size clocks in at a cool $20, $35 for the 4oz, which is a total steal either way for how long the tin will last you.

As someone who struggles with chronic pain, some of my most favorite things to do in the world are often cut short by the way that I’m feeling: hiking, swimming, traveling, all confined by aches and pains when I should be exploring worry-free in my 22-year-old vessel. The instant relief provided by a quick lather of Remedy (a namesake meant to be interpreted verbatim) has fueled my adventures for the last several months and allowed me to climb mountains, both metaphorically and literally. It’s a backpack essential as far as I’m concerned and you won’t catch me on a trek without it anytime soon. 

Madame Mary Jane’s Harvest Horoscopes

illustration by Renee Thompson @renee.eporita

Aries (March 21st- April 20th)

Aries, there will be a small change that will seem chaotic or stressful to you, like maybe your favorite budtender leaving or your favorite strain disappearing, but don’t get too strung out over it. Instead, go with the flow and embrace this new change and break your old routine by trying something new like an edible or concentrate. 

Fall Tarot Card: The Tower (distress, adversity, disgrace)

Taurus (April 21st- May 21st)

Taurus, now is the time to splurge on something you’ve always been curious about. Perhaps it is a bit more in price or THC content than you’re used to, but as long as you’re comfortable you should reach out for that special something. If you’ve never tried it, try getting a pearl and watching a spooky movie. 

Fall Tarot Card: Three of Wands (effort, discovery, strength)

Gemini (May 22nd- June 21st)

Gemini, if you’ve been feeling stuck lately take a chance and trust the recommendation of your favorite stoner. Have they been raving about a certain strain? Does your budtender swear by this harvest’s Blue Dream? Now is the time to get out of your funk and find out what all the ruckus is about.

Fall Tarot Card: The Chariot (providence, triumph, chance)

Cancer (June 22nd- July 22nd)

Cancer, when you find yourself feeling dull and worn out from your usual 420 routine, consider taking T-break and cutting out or lower your THC consumption. Taking a T-break can help you ‘clear the fog’ you’ve been stuck in lately and heighten your next experience when you want to reintroduce THC again. 

Fall Tarot Card: Knight of Wands (absence, departure, flight)

Leo (July 23rd- August 23rd)

Leo, when you want to treat yourself to something new, think about trying an activated beverage. These drinks can be a great way to experience the modern advances of the cannabis industry and if you’ve ever wondered what a canna-twist on drinks like lemonade, soda, and beer taste like, bring it up to your favorite budtender. 

Fall Tarot Card: Temperance (moderation, frugality, economy)

Virgo (August 24th- September 22nd) 

Virgo, remember that the transition from summer to fall is harder for others. If you’ve been feeling slightly depressed or sluggish, try a fruity sativa like Grapefruit. You can also try doing activities in sunlight and exercising, like smoking a joint after an autumn walk or hike.

Fall Tarot Card: Nine of Swords (disappointment, despair, sluggishness) 

Libra (September 23rd- October 22nd) 

Libra, if you are ready to try something stronger than your usual THC treat, maybe it’s time to try concentrates. In my experience, concentrates made from OG strains are usually easy to find in the fall time, but this can change from harvest to harvest, so ask your budtender what they recommend next time you stop in on Shatterday. 

Fall Tarot Card: The Emperor (power, stability, reason)

Scorpio (October 23rd- November 21st)

Scorpio, this fall I recommend trying out more indicas. You’re in need of that calm, peaceful feeling that indicas are famous for producing. Now might also be an excellent time to get into making art or carving a jack-o-lantern. My personal favorite indicas have always been in the Kush family, mostly because there always seems to be fun combinations. Maybe you can try a few out and find a new favorite. 

Fall Tarot Card: Four of Wands (harmony, peace, prosperity) 

Sagittarius (November 22nd- December 21st) 

Sagittarius, this season you should spend your time diversifying your cannabis palette. One easy way to do this is to take advantage of gram specials. Now is a good time for you to settle on a favorite dispensary, or at least take this as an excuse to branch out more in your consumption habits. 

Fall Tarot Card: Three of Swords (removal, division, dispersion) 

Capricorn (December 22nd- January 20th) 

Capricorn, for this spooky season, I recommend experimenting with mild or low THC strains like R4 or Charlotte’s Web and focusing on mindfulness. But if you are thinking about trying more than one strain out this fall, try and keep a journal about your favorite CBD strains and how you interact with them. 

Fall Tarot Card: Eight of Cups (mildness, joy, modesty) 

Aquarius (January 21st- February 19th)

Aquarius, as someone who tends to be off in their own world, I would suggest at some point this season using a canna-bath bomb. Especially if you find your thoughts being more tangled than usual. Taking a nice canna-bath can give you time to mull things over and treat sore muscles. 

Tarot Card: Ace of Swords (love, triumph, excessive)

Pisces (February 20th- March 20th) 

Pisces, this fall is a time for you to return to your roots. For many of us, this means smoking a joint. This could also be a good time to go back to your first favorite strains if you’re feeling nostalgic. Whatever brings you back to your favorite moments, and if you haven’t learned yet, try rolling your own joints or carving your own apple pipe. 

Fall Tarot Card: The Hierophant (tradition, alliance, goodness)

Strain of The Month: Cantaloupe Haze

Written and photographed by Noah Noteboom

As you sit in your room listening to the rain hit the roof, you find yourself craving something to do. With the weather taking a turn for the worst, staying indoors is probably a good idea. Autumn gives us the opportunity to huddle around the fire or catch up on those movies we have stashed away for rainy days. But movies like Hocus Pocus, Good Will Hunting or The Nightmare Before Christmas can only provide entertainment for so long, before you need something else to do.

That is where our Strain of the Month comes into play. Cantaloupe Haze (also spelled as Cannalope Haze) takes the honor this month. Although low in CBD, this flower more than makes up for it with earthy smells and a higher concentration of THC.

This indica-dominant strain is a mix of Mexican and Haze Brothers to create a blend of cannabis that is meant to uplift the spirits and soothe your mind. Cantaloupe Haze can be a sweet relief from the seasonal sadness that often comes with the change in weather.

The fruity flower has a very potent aroma. The smell of flowers and tropical sweets romance you, and the earthy nugs have a similar taste as well. As you indulge, you can taste hints of sweet and sour melons along with a slight whiff of pine in the aftertaste. 

With THC levels ranging anywhere from 20-28%, use caution when smoking this strain. It is recommended that newer users consume smaller doses and with lots of patience to avoid couch-lock. As with most indica strains, the amount you intake has a direct impact on the weight of the effects. Smoking just the right amount will make getting things done a breeze. But be careful, because if taken in excess, this strain will leave you feeling sleepy and unmotivated.

Especially in the current condition of the world, Cantaloupe Haze offers a big morale boost. Quarantine will feel a little less claustrophobic and a bit brighter with this mellow, productive strain guiding you through the day. 

Unconventional Recipes: Cooking with Sticks

Written and photographed by Renee Thompson

*Edibles should only be shared and eaten by consenting adults and/or medical patients. Cannabis ingredients should be stored in a safe place away from children.*

 When I first started smoking, I thought the only useful thing a leftover cannabis stem could do was clean out a bowl in a pinch. It wasn’t until I started getting into edibles that I learned you can actually use sticks in cooking. The first thing I ever made was a simple stick tea. Unlike a high from smoking, I have found that using sticks in edibles leads to a less powerful taste and less intense high than cooking exclusively with buds. This type of high is more of a physical one and is great for managing pain. But you can also cook with a combination of sticks and flower if you want to get the best of both worlds. The more earthy tea-like taste of the sticks pairs wonderfully with nuts in cookies or spices in curries.

Finding Your Happy Place

Know that anything with sugar, oil, or butter in a recipe can be substituted for a medicated equivalent, but pay attention to how much you add in. In recipes that only call for a tablespoon or two of butter I usually use all cannabutter, but in recipes with more than a ½ cup of butter I usually only use half cannabutter in order to better control my edible experience. This is because everyone processes THC differently, so it is extremely important to start small and start slowly. If you are new to taking edibles, try using less potent THC ingredients or half of the suggested amount in recipes. It is extremely important to decarboxylate your flower and sticks so that the mixture stays intact enough for the stomach to absorb it but also be altered by the heat to activate the THC.

After everything is decarboxylated you can experiment with everyday cooking, like mixing it with salt or other spices. I have found that adding a few pinches of decarboxylated bud can bring out new flavors in everyday foods like pasta or salad and in some cases a very light high. Keeping a journal is a must when making your own edibles. You can experiment with different recipes, dosages, decarboxylation time, infusion time, and amounts of bud to sticks. Keep an eye on yourself and how you feel, and adjust your recipes slowly. Finally, when consuming a final product you haven’t tried before, try eating half a serving then waiting 30 minutes before having more. Remember that you can always have more later but you can’t travel back in time once the edibles have activated.

Pairings

Certain foods mix well with edibles because they contain molecules that can enhance the THC experience. For instance, when I made pancakes with stick butter, I topped them with a mango syrup and the experience was much more intense than just having a pancake with maple syrup. This is because mangoes have myrcene terpenes, which are known to interact with and even enhance THC. Similarly, chocolate has anandamide inside of it, which can bind to the brain in a similar way that THC does. So using these ingredients in addition to medicated ingredients can create intense feelings without using up your whole cannabis supply.

It may seem like a lot of work, but making your own edibles is a great way to have a more personal relationship with how you get high or medicate. At first, there might be some trial and error, but the pay-off is more than worth it. Working on basic cooking skills helps a lot too, and if you’ve waited for a reason to get into baking, kombucha or breadmaking, now is your time. Above all, listen to your body and be as creative as you can!

Stick Tea

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Decarboxylation Time: 40 minutes

Activation Time: approx.15-40 minutes

Serving: 1

         Ingredients

                     -1/2 tsp of sticks

                     -1/2 tsp tea

                     -1 cup of hot water

         Directions

 1. Decarboxylate your sticks by placing them in an oven safe glass pan for 40 minutes at 220-240F. Stir them every 10-15 minutes to prevent burning.

2. In a tea strainer, reusable tea bag, or cheese cloth, place the sticks and tea inside.

 3. Let the mixture steep for ten minutes in hot water.

 4. Consume and enjoy!

Butter with Sticks

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Decarboxylation Time: 40 minutes

Activation Time: approx. 20-45 minutes

Servings: 8-12

         Ingredients

                     -1 stick of butter

                     -2 TBS of water

                     -2g of sticks

                     -0.5g of flower

         Directions

1. Grind the sticks and bud using a grinder. The sticks should be finely chopped, and the bud should be finely grated.

2. Use a mortar and pestle to finely grind the sticks and stems, or put them through the grinder two-four more times.

3. Once this is done place your mixture in a glass oven safe pan or inside a metal pan with tin foil. Let the mixture bake at 235F for forty minutes. Stir them every 10-15 minutes to prevent burning. This will decarboxylate the ingredients. 

4. Fill a small saucepan 2/3 of the way with water and place a metal bowl on top creating a double boiler. On a medium heat, melt the butter inside the metal bowl and wait for it to melt.

5. Once the butter has melted and the stick and flowers have decarboxylated, place the mixture in a stainless-steel tea strainer and turn the heat down to low.

6. Add the 2 TBS of water to the melted butter and let this mixture cook for four and a half hours, stirring the mixture every half hour. To make the butter absorb all of the THC goodness, when you stir the butter open up your strainer carefully and press down on the butter soaked stem/flower mixture with a spoon letting any excess butter drip into your bowl.

7. There should be a visible change in color and odor in your butter. Once this is achieved do a final drain of your tea strainer and put the butter mixture in a container with a lid. The butter should harden after three hours. Take the butter out of the container and drain any excess water that may be inside. Place back into the container or cook with it immediately. Store the butter in the fridge for up to a week.

Tiger Butter Fudge

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Chill Time: 40-60 minutes

Decarboxylation Time: 40 minutes

Activation Time: approx. 20-50 minutes

Servings: 13

         Ingredients

-2 TBS coconut oil (Infused with 1.5g sticks and 0.5g flower)

-1/2 cups peanut butter

-1/4 cup white chocolate chips

-1/2 cup of milk or dark chocolate chips

         Directions

1. Decarboxylate your ingredients, and infuse the coconut oil using the double boiler and tea strainer method on a low heat until there is a visible change in color/odor.

2. Mix in the peanut butter with the infused coconut oil until it is completely melted. Keep on a low to medium heat to avoid burning.

3. Add white chocolate chips, wait until they have completely melted into the peanut butter before taking it off the heat source.

4. In a separate double boiler, place the milk or dark chocolate chips in the bowl on a low heat until completely melted. 

5. In a glass oven-safe dish or pan place about ¼ of the peanut butter mixture. Be sure to cover as much of the bottom as you can and work quickly before the mixture hardens.

6. Add about 1/3 of the milk/dark chocolate mixture in various areas of the pan. Mix lightly with a chopstick.

7. Alternate between adding the peanut butter mixture and the milk/dark chocolate mixture until they are both depleted. You should end with milk/dark chocolate to get the distinctive tiger stripes.

8. Use the chopstick to design the tiger stripes, I recommend using s-shaped swirls. Stop when you have reached a nice design, but before the two mixtures are completely incorporated.

9. Place in the fridge for 40-60 minutes, the fudge should be solid and cool to the touch.

10. Take out of the fridge and cut 13 even slices. Store in the freezer for a week or the fridge for a week and a half. 

11. Consume one slice at a time, and wait at least 30 minutes before eating more. Enjoy with strawberry ice cream for a canna-peanut butter and jelly flavored sundae.

Strain of the Month: Lemon Flufuns

written by Emma Routley

Feeling the lack of motivation to do anything while in quarantine?  Lemon Flufluns will be your cheerleader for encouragement!  

Lemon Flufluns takes a few puffs to show its effects, especially if you already have a high tolerance. With 16.0% THC and 11.08% CBD, the strain qualifies as a 1:1. While that THC percentage might not look high, you’ll certainly notice how calm and focused you feel after consumption.  Although there isn’t much information online about the new strain just yet, it’s one worth asking your dispensary about!

The sweet, sticky smell of the bud is comparable to the pollen you’d usually be outside sneezing from around this time of year.  After consumption, a mellow feeling of zen followed by a light high will gear you up for whatever task is at hand.  Working on any assignment during these uncertain times can feel frustrating, but not after consuming Lemon Flufluns.

This strain will get you excited about whatever’s right in front of you, whether it be homework, social media, cooking or more.  Be careful though: distractions are most definitely welcome during this high and your focus might shift onto other things if they’re shiny enough. Look out for leaving the stove on! If you take a bathroom break you might get sidetracked by what’s in the mirror and forget all about that mac and cheese.

If your back hurts from sitting around all day with nothing to do, the CBD in Lemon Flufluns will help banish the physical ailments from your body while the THC goes to work on opening up your mind.  Getting along with the people who have been on your nerves while in quarantine will be a breeze. Zoom classes and meetings will feel more like a social event than something you’re required to do. 

With a healed body and fresh perspective, Lemon Flufluns will welcome different ideas and deep conversations with the people around you.  Or, if you have no one, phone calls are a great idea.  Suddenly the mundane existence of quarantine will seem stimulating and exciting! Hopefully you prepared ahead of time and have snacks in your household, you’ll need them once the munchies kick in.

The downside is that Lemon Flufluns doesn’t fade away slowly.  You’ll suddenly realize you’re back in the reality of your life.  However, just knowing Lemon Flufluns is out there to take care of you again will help you feel like everything’s going to be alright.

Cannabis and the Lungs

written by Alexandra Arnett @calyx.alex, photographed by Nina Compeau

All too often you will see people make the erroneous claim that smoking cannabis does not harm your lungs. This misconception is often conflated with the statement “smoking cannabis is better than smoking cigarettes,” and while that may have some truth to it, there are still reasons why cannabis smoke is also harmful. This harm comes not so much from the cannabis itself, but the method of inhalation. Cannabis can be inhaled in a various number of ways, from rolling a joint, packing a bowl in a bong or pipe, using a vaporizer or getting fancy with a dab rig. Among other reasons, devices such as a dab rig or a vape pen make research surrounding the effects of inhaling cannabis difficult to conduct.

The current research that has been published on the topic often fails to control for tobacco usage, methods of inhalation and variables like whether or not the flower was free of mold and pesticides. Research has indicated that cannabis smoke has similar carcinogenic effects as tobacco, but there is not a strong correlation between cannabis smoke and lung cancer. Though cannabis inhalation can cause the same symptoms that tobacco inhalation can, like coughing, wheezing and chronic bronchitis, there are some important benefits. Unlike tobacco inhalation, cannabis inhalation is not a primary factor in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), nor does it reduce your lungs’ forced expiratory volume. In fact, research has shown that cannabis inhalation may increase your lungs’ forced vital capacity. The active component in cannabis, delta 9-THC, has even been demonstrated as a bronchodilator along with the terpene pinene.

If you’re concerned about the health of your lungs, there are a few things you can do! The number one suggestion would be to use methods that don’t involve inhalation, like edibles or tinctures. If you like cannabis flower and prefer to inhale, try out a flower vaporizer! By vaping cannabis with heat instead of combusting it with fire, the inhalation of several carcinogens can be avoided. The best products on the market for flower vaporizers include the PAX 2 and PAX 3. For a long-term quality vape to use at home, the original Volcano vaporizer is the number one choice.

To keep with your old school style of a pipe, bong or joint, there are a few simple tricks to create fewer carcinogens from the smoke. One is to stick with glass smoking pieces that have a longer stem. If you’re looking to use a bong, a long neck and an ice catcher design to help cool the smoke is best. In addition, use only filtered water, this helps provide the cleanest filter for the smoke. The best way to light your flower in a pipe or bong is by first lighting a candle (the more natural the better), then light up some hemp wick using the candle and from here you can light your flower with the hemp wick! Through this method you can reduce the inhalation of toxic carcinogens that come with using lighters, this can also be used for lighting joints. In addition to using hemp wick to light a joint, use a crutch or filter and stick with unbleached hemp or rice papers. We have probably all had our experiences with smoking roaches from old joints, but this is not really healthy as it is concentrated with tars and other toxins.

Vape pens fall into a unique category. These pens are made using either ceramic, glass or metal coils, and depending on the battery can be vaped at various temperatures. Words of wisdom for purchasing vape pens include purchasing from brands that don’t use artificial flavorings, botanically-derived terpenes, or MCT oil. Along with using the lowest heat seating, this limits the risk of inhaling any harmful compounds or toxins.

Moving into using dab rigs, there are some very important notes to make. The first is to remember that products used with a dab rig are likely made with hydrocarbons. It is very important to be purchasing these products from a legal dispensary where you know the product has been tested for residual toxins. Temperature is extremely important when using a dab rig and there are a few reasons for this. One is that certain terpenes, such as myrcene, can turn into toxic compounds if heated at high temperatures. Your dab nail should never turn red hot while heating for a dab—you should stop as soon as you see a color change. Dabs should not be taken at temperatures of more than 600 degrees Fahrenheit. The safest nails to use on a dab rig are ceramic or quartz glass that is made in America. Don’t forget to let your nail cool for just under a minute before dropping that dab in your banger!

Overall, the research we do have to go off of tells us that smoke inhalation of any kind is not particularly best for your lungs. Until more research on the subject is done, the precautions listed above are the best steps you can take right now to protect the health of your lungs.