Budtender Spotlight: Kyrsha Witherspoon

Interview and Photo by Anna Glavash

How and when did you become a budtender?

Two years ago, I started at Twenty After Four. I was wanting to get out of the retirement home I was working at, and I was recreationally smoking because of my social anxiety. I had a friend that was working at Twenty After Four, and she said it would be a good fit for me. She thought it would help me to step out of my comfort zone and tried to work there, and it did help me a lot.

First time you got high?

I was overwhelmed. I had a group of friends with me that had already been smoking, and they kind of played jokes on me. It also opened me up to different perspectives. We got to talking, and certain things that I wouldn’t normally be too open about, I was able to talk about more easily.

Funny customer interaction?

I’ll have people come in and say, “It smells good! What do you have in here?” They’ll act like they don’t really know what they’re stepping into, which they probably don’t, but it’s funny to break the ice by saying, “Oh, I got weed here.”

What is a stereotype about cannabis users that’s true and one that you think is false?

The one about being more open to ideas is true. I feel like a lot of people that haven’t tried cannabis are more narrow-minded, but being a part of the industry, I’ve noticed how people actually listen to other people’s ideas and are open to them.

One that isn’t true is that everyone who smokes is lazy. I honestly will wake up, smoke a bowl and start my day. That’s just something that goes with my morning coffee. It’s a ritual. Some people probably think that you can’t get stuff done because you’re smoking all day. But I would say I can use it and be productive as well.

What do you look for in a strain?

I like to be able to function throughout the day, so I lean towards sativas and hybrids. Pineapple or fruit flavored strains are the ones I like, and I definitely use my nose.

What’s special about this shop?

The company motto is “Treat Everyone Like Gold.” When you step in here you’re going to be treated like anyone else, whether you’re the CEO of a company or a person that just wants a joint. Some other shops that I’ve been into just want to get that sale. It’s different here. We want to see what needs we can help you with. We pay a lot of attention to that aspect and it goes a long way.

Favorite way to consume?

I like to smoke out of glass. I have an Empire bong at home. I used to like to roll up blunts but then I got more educated on the stuff I was using, so I stick to more Raw papers and glass now.

What do you do when you’re not here?

Usually I’ll hang out with my family. My cousin is one of the only people that will actually sit down, smoke with you and talk about whatever. Anything that I want to talk about we can just smoke down and talk about it with a bowl.

Are you high right now?

A little bit!

Elev8 Cannabis has been open for nine months. They’re open M-F 8-10 and 10-10 weekends at 2055 West 12th Ave.

Hemp Press: Saving the World One Sheet at a Time

Words by Kelsey Tidball | Photo by Sierra Pedro

Did you know that more than seven billion trees are cut down each year to provide us with paper products alone? Did you know that instead of cutting down all those trees, paper can be made out of hemp? And did you know that hemp paper is sustainable and can be entirely tree-free? Matthew Glyer has spent years of his life grappling with these questions, and when he opened Hemp Press in 2013, he became the proprietor of the first exclusively hemp paper print shop in the nation. Hemp Press is the only printing company of its kind, and it’s located right here in Eugene! The company specializes in creating and designing hemp-based packaging for hemp and marijuana-based products, labels, business cards and their trademark Crutch Cards.

“Hemp paper is controversial,” Glyer says. “The paper mills don’t want to make craft paper and the printers don’t want to print with it.” Glyer says this is mostly due to the fibrous nature of craft papers and the particularity of hemp paper, which is made from the core of the hemp plant.

“Most printers run the risk of having a piece of hemp break off and completely ruin the machine, but ours is equipped for that.” It took Glyer four years to figure out how to print on hemp paper, and now that he has cracked the code, he sees the opportunity to incorporate hemp paper into the economic and agricultural norm.

“Our big goal is to keep manufacturing in the United States and to source the fiber from the United States,” Glyer says.

Previously, the primary source for hemp fiber was Canada, where the government both subsidized and funded the industrial hemp industry. However, since the funds for hemp research and production dried up a few years ago, hemp growers and enthusiasts in the U.S. have been searching for a way to bring the industrial hemp industry to native soil.

“Currently, we do not really have the infrastructure in the U.S. to process hemp fiber,” Glyer says, expressing a desire to inspire farmers to actually grow hemp. However, the farmers need a guarantee that the hemp crops they grow will be turned into products that people will regularly buy and use. This is a promise that is becoming easier to make with the introduction of hemp clothing, beauty products and supplements to mainstream grocery stores like Costco and Whole Foods.

Glyer and his colleagues want to turn hemp into a mainstream agricultural commodity, and they hope their printing business will help people see that hemp is a useful and sustainable crop that could help save the planet.

Historically, hemp was widely used to produce products such as rope, clothing and even classic Henry Ford automobiles. However, following Prohibition, the hemp industry was shut down due to its association with marijuana and other illicit substances. This history of government restrictions makes it exceedingly difficult to restart the industry in the U.S. today.

“Part of getting hemp back in the market is branding,” Glyer says. “Hemp-based branding ought not to scream ‘weed,’ so our branding services aim to produce more subtle designs that connect with a broader market.” Hemp Press prints packaging for beauty products, lotions, smoking accessories and other marijuana-related businesses.

“Ultimately, hemp is good for the planet,” Glyer says. “That’s why we need to keep growing it and keep making everyday things out of it if we can.”

He’s right—hemp is naturally resilient, thus eliminating the need for most pesticides and herbicides. According to a study done by the American Chemical Society, hemp also cleans the soil, absorbs CO2 from the soil as it grows and can be used as a substitute for many non-sustainable products. This includes traditional plastics, building materials, and—of course—paper.

Instagram: @hemp.press

Website: www.hemp.press

Email: contact@hemp.press

 

Dabbing for Dummies

Words by Skyla Patton | Photo by Sierra Pedro

Very different from its distant dance move cousin “the Dab,” the trend of dabbing has swept the cannabis industry. Rigs of all sizes, shapes and colors became available in shops and quickly filled up display cases in what seemed liked mere weeks during the late 2000s. Where did this intense way to ingest our weed come from? Though you might still feel a little concerned when someone pulls a blowtorch out of their backpack, you’ll soon see that it’s nothing to fret over. Read on for a background of what exactly dabbing is and how it ripped through the marijuana industry.

Dabbing has actually been present for several decades, but it just recently boomed in popularity and access. Extracting cannabinoids produces sticky oils, most often known as shatter or wax that can be stored in non-stick containers like small rubber bins or squashed between wax paper. The oil is heated to an incredibly high temperature—enter the scary blowtorch—and then inhaled through a dab rig. Unfortunately, most extraction processes are so intense that the aromatic aspects of strains are lost and the flavors can blend in with one another. Due to the concentrated THC, dabs are essentially the fastest and most intense way to get incredibly stoned, incredibly fast. They are also highly renowned for individuals with chronic pain for instant relief upon ingestion.

With time, the process has evolved and been altered by scientists and amateurs alike. It’s important to mention dabbing is still cautioned against due to its dangerous qualities and processes. Properly extracting the oil from the flower requires lab tests, extraction equipment (read: a lot of chemicals) and high grade solvents. While playing scientist can seem fun at face value, the risks and dangers of trying to craft your own oils generally outweigh the positives of making your own wax.

Criticized for its debilitating powers, dabbing is often not recommended for beginner smokers. Most strains of oil range between 60 to 95 percent THC—“good” flower for joints or bowls on average ranges around 18 or 20 percent. It’s also on the more complicated spectrum of ways to get high, but if you’re determined or just plain curious, there’s plenty of ways to get started. Local dispensaries will offer inexpensive and easy ways to get your foot in the door. Dab rigs, glass or metal dab nails and as many types of shatter as you could imagine are more than likely to be lined up in their very own display case. It’s important to remember while venturing into the world of dabbing that while fatal overdose is impossible, an uncomfortable overdose is very much possible. Pay attention to the dosage of your oil and start small to ensure a positive experience.

Eugene is not lacking in access to dispensaries, and if you’re ready to take the first puff into the world of dabbing, there’s plenty of places to get started. Local Eugenian Jake Beneat offered some extra pointers for novice dabbers. “I smoke dabs because my tolerance has been built up so highly that smoking bud in joints or pipes feels like a waste a lot of the time. Dabs are a surefire way to get ripped really quickly and effectively, so I really only smoke oil anymore.” He emphasized the instant gratification aspect of dabbing that is commonly talked about. Beneat has had his medical card for a little under a year now and considers himself to be a seasoned smoker. We asked what his favorite location is for his oils of choice. “TJ’s has three locations that are easy to get to, the best prices and quality oils so they’re my go-to dispensary here in Eugene. I have chronic back and neck pain, so dabs are the fastest relief for me.” Check out local dispensaries and consult extraction professionals for helpful tips or the best places to purchase oil of your liking.

 

Like Honey To Bees: Cannabis Extraction from Flower to Jar

Words by Anna Glavash | Photo by Sierra Pedro

If you’ve ever dabbed or vaped cannabis oil, you’ve probably wondered, “How did the cannabis flower become this golden substance?”

Cannabis extracts have come a long way since the dangerous days of open blasting and black-market butane hash oil (BHO). Today’s extraction process is done by highly trained experts in lab coats with state-of-the-art equipment, and the product is put through rigorous tests before going onto dispensary shelves. With so many quality extracts now on the market, it can be tough to choose. Here’s a look at how two innovative local extractors produce premium cannabis oil.

Hydrocarbon Extraction

Willamette Valley Alchemy (WVA) makes a range of top-shelf cannabis products including edibles and solventless concentrates, but specializes in hydrocarbon extracts, which is cannabis oil that’s been separated from dried plant material using a hydrocarbon solvent blend.

The process usually begins with trim or flower that didn’t make it to market for one reason or another, such as small batch or small bud size. WVA mostly works with farms that are Clean-Green certified, which is the cannabis industry’s version of the organic standard. All their products are co-branded, so you know which farm and flower it was made from.

WVA sources locally-manufactured lab equipment from Cascade Botanicals and Sweet Leaf Extractors. They use a passive closed-loop system which allows them to recapture almost all of the solvent for reuse. They clean the equipment obsessively to minimize any contamination, and double-distill their solvents to ensure they’re ultra-clean. Because the flower they source is top-shelf, they only use the highest quality gas and equipment they can get to honor the plant. “We treat everything like gold,” says WVA Head of Production Adam Chase.

Picture yourself in Walter White’s lab from Breaking Bad—and not the one in the Winnebago. Chase may not be a chemistry teacher, but he’s no less meticulous. Here’s what happens in the spark-proof room where the oil is extracted:

The dry plant material is packed into a column through which a liquid gas is pumped. They use a proprietary blend of solvents including butane and propane to separate the cannabinoids from the plant. The gas is chilled to -100 degrees using dry ice.

Once it’s been run through, the solvent is distilled out using warm water and what’s left is the oil. Once filtered, this oil is poured off and put into a vacuum oven for several days to cure. The negative pressure lowers the boiling point of the residual solvent, which slowly bubbles out. The low temperature allows the oil to retain maximum cannabinoids and terpenes for the most similar user experience to smoking the actual flower.

When all the solvent is gone, the product is sent off to be independently tested, and when confirmed that it’s free of solvents and pesticides, it’s packaged onsite. Test results, including THC percentage, are printed on the label.

The extract might be packaged in a resealable plastic pouch or weighed out into tiny glass jars, depending on its consistency. Though the process is the same, different flowers produce different results. Chase likens it to a unique personality: “The lifeforce of one plant is going to be different from that of another plant, even it’s the same strain grown in the same region.” This can range from a very stable “shatter” to a “sauce” or somewhere in between: “budder” or “wax.” Higher terpene content produces a more flavorful but also more volatile, less stable oil. All of these products are best refrigerated.

Chase and co-owner Brice Sherman built WVA to produce exactly what they wanted to smoke and share it with the community. His favorite part of the job? “It helps people who have medical conditions, and it makes people happy. If somebody had a shit day at work and they got home and they had their partner yelling at them, and their dog bit them when they walked in the door but they have their WVA dab ready, and they take that dab and they’re good, that is the most satisfying part. ”

CO2 Extraction

Critical Source (CS) is focused on full-spectrum CO2 oil formulas, but take a very different approach from other vape pen producers. Cartridges are popular for their convenience, but the flavor or effects can be compromised by a quick and dirty extraction process. The goal of CS’s full-spectrum extracts is to replicate the experience of smoking the real flower, but in cartridge form. Not only should the experience feel more authentic, “the effects can last substantially longer than distillate products,” says founding partner Kenan Hester.

CS’s CO2 extraction process is focused on retaining dimensionality and bioactive compounds of the flower through terpene profile preservation and cannabinoid profile retention that’s true to the cultivar—capturing the plant’s unique essence, if you will.

Initially created for the medical market, their extracts are made using CO2 in place of a hydrocarbon solvent. Although more expensive and time-consuming, CO2 is considered among the safest ways to produce and consume extracts. Hester says, “Great extracts that target therapeutic value should capture everything that you want from the plant and strip away everything that you don’t want.” The good stuff is those bio-active terpenes and cannabinoids. In post-processing, they aim to exclude plant compounds like waxes and lipids that can cause irritation in the lungs.

The process goes like this: The flower is put into the extraction chamber and saturated with low-temperature, low-pressure “subcritical” CO2. First, the terpenes are isolated in a liquid form and put aside. Then temperature and pressure is ramped up to “supercritical” levels, and the CO2 extracts the cannabinoids in a process similar to steeping tea.

The system’s patented back-pressure regulator gradually drops levels back down as the solution travels to the collection point, where CO2 and raw extract are separated. The CO2 vapor rises and is recycled back into the system. The raw extract left behind still contains those unwanted plant waxes and lipids, so it’s then homogenized with ethanol and put through a process called winterization to remove them.

Many CO2 extractors aren’t able to isolate the terpenes at the first stage, so they get winterized too, which can destroy them and create a generic flavor and character. Others may spend 2-4 days winterizing, but CS lets theirs go for 10-12 days until absolutely nothing else can be removed, giving their cartridge a very smooth hit.

Finally, the terpenes are reblended with the cannabinoids to achieve the finished product. CS never uses food-grade or bulk-cannabis derived terpenes, so you can be sure everything in the cartridge came from the same source and vaporizing it will mimic the experience of smoking the flower itself.

Hester likens this process to wine blending and says a little goes a long way. “You can have a Cabernet and Merlot blend that has only 1% Merlot, but as soon as you add that in, it can completely change the entire experience.” Similarly, using just a tiny bit of the original terpenes has a huge effect on the character of the extract.

When Hester founded the company in 2014, the market had a lot of great hydrocarbon extracts, but CS saw a need for more connoisseur-grade CO2 extractions. Though the barrier to entry in this method is much higher, CS wanted to advance the quality and availability of options for patients. It maintains these standards of quality in its recreational products and has just launched a premium line of co-branded vape cartridges called Kalapooya Fire. This brand seeks to honor the history of the Kalapuya people, from whom the culture of eco-stewardship in the Willamette Valley originated hundreds of years before the modern cannabis industry. Kalapooya Fire seeks to source from farms that emulate the sustainable practices of the Kalapuya people. To honor this legacy, they’re also launching a scholarship which supports Oregon Native American students who study chemistry & horticulture at the University level.

The Greener Side: Eugene’s Longest Running Dispensary

words by Delaney Rea | photo by Trevor Meyer

When Joe Hopkins moved to Eugene in 2012, Tracktown USA wasn’t his first choice. His family was more drawn to the city of Bend – the snow offered in that part of the state was particularly enticing. However, what ultimately made Eugene the place to go was a different kind of market – the marijuana dispensary market.

Hopkins and his wife, Chelsea, saw a need in the city for a quality provider of cannabis products. That’s why they started The Greener Side, the dispensary that they continue to own and operate. When they started their business, the state legislation hadn’t yet legalized the sale of recreational marijuana. Because of this, The Greener Side started out as a strictly medical dispensary. With this license to sell, the dispensary was welcomed by the cannabis-friendly communities of the city. It’s been on the strength of that community that the business has continued to thrive, making it the longest-running dispensary in Eugene.

However, it hasn’t always been smooth sailing for Eugene’s senior cannabis supplier. On May 23, 2013, only months after opening, The Greener Side was subject to a government raid. Although they were authorized to sell marijuana to medical patients by state law, federal law had the jurisdiction to intervene. What began as just another day in the cannabis industry saw the arrival of police, who arrested the entire staff. According to Hopkins, his personal home was also raided, private phones were confiscated and the bank accounts of the business were promptly closed. Hopkins’ wife was released that day, and they reopened their business within the next 24 hours. Though the business itself fought to overcome this obstacle, Hopkins said, “support from the community helped us keep going and kept our fire fueled.”

The legislation passed by Measure 91 to legalize the sale of recreational marijuana in 2015 brought relief to the fear of further raids occurring. “We’re extremely happy to be working in the legal market,” Hopkins said. When the new legislation took effect, The Greener side began selling their products recreationally. Soon after, Hopkins saw the customer demographics patronizing his store start to change. 21-year-olds started to come in on their birthdays for their first stop of many. Senior citizens, intrigued by the new market, began purchasing more and more cannabis product, finding it to be an effective medication for many ailments. Hopkins even met a woman who could recall a time before marijuana prohibition, when she had the same freedom to buy that she does now.

Hopkins has seen the normalization of marijuana as a necessary step for the industry since before the days of The Greener Side. Starting out, he decided to change the negative stigma that many people have associated with weed through the actions of his business. Since 2013, The Greener Side has hosted an annual charity golf tournament. This event has raised over $10,000 in the past four years, with the proceeds going toward multiple sclerosis.

As a member of Eugene’s Chamber of Commerce and the International Rotary Club, Hopkins has put his foot in the door of local business to make one thing clear: dispensaries are a credible business model. “It’s pretty awesome that I can go to any Rotary Club meeting in the world now, and I’ll be there for cannabis,” he said. “I can talk about my cannabis openly and proudly now.”

Being the oldest marijuana dispensary in Eugene and Springfield means that The Greener Side has persevered while seeing competitors come and go. While he welcomes the competition, Hopkins recognizes why many of them don’t last, attributing the ongoing success of his business to its commitment to customer integrity. “Changes to the industry don’t affect our protocol,” Hopkins said. Putting the customer first and staying consistent with the quality of the products they offer has earned the business a more loyal following than newer dispensaries that simply follow the latest trends.

Part of the customer loyalty that The Greener Side offers is daily deals that make marijuana consumption more affordable.  “Presumptions are left at the door,” Hopkins said. “When people come in here, they’re all coming in for the same thing. That’s something to better their life.” There are plenty of deals at The Greener Side to help improve customers’ lives. Mondays bring 15 percent off all edible products, and Tuesdays offer 10 percent off any purchase of $40 or over. On Wednesdays, customers can get $5 off the price of The Greener Side’s top-tier strains. Thursdays offer 15 percent off all products based in CBD, the cannabinoid with relaxing effects, and Fridays bring 20 percent off the purchase of seeds. Additionally, The Greener Side has a free membership program that customers can use to get further discounts and win periodically offered prizes.

Ultimately, the successful business Hopkins has built is only the beginning of the company’s potential. On Nov. 10, The Greener Side opened a new location in Detroit Lake, Oregon. Hopkins hopes to next franchise out into the greater Eugene and Springfield area. With an emphasis on customer loyalty, commitment to superior quality and a business model that has proven longevity, the future of The Greener Side looks bright.

The Hempiest Time of Year: Eugene’s 2017 Hemp Gift Guide

words by Sierra Pedro | photo contributed by Mountain Rose Herbs

From skincare to clothing to lip balm, hemp products make great go-to gifts for any of your Oregonian friends. We compiled a list of local, hemp products you might consider purchasing for a special someone in your life!

Hemp Hoop Infinity Scarf, $15

Made with 55% hemp and 45% organic cotton jersey, these cozy scarves are guaranteed to please a special fashionista in your life this holiday season. Currently offered in sea foam and iris colors.

Shop: sweetskins.com, 850 West 2nd St.

Street Purse, $48

The Eco Boutique, home to Of the Earth Organic Apparel, offers stylish purses that can be worn over the shoulder or as a handbag. They are also on discount at $29 on their website right now! Currently offered in black and denim colors.

Shop: oftheearth.com, 782 Blair Blvd.

Sprout Bag, $16.50

Made with 100% hemp, this 7” by 10.5” sprout bag is a go-to gift for any cooking guru. Just include some seeds, water and your sprouts will be ready in 3 to 5 days!

Shop: mountainroseherbs.com, 152 W 5th Ave. #3

Hemp Seed Oil, $11

An 8.5 oz. bottle of quality oil a delightful present for any kitchen enthusiast in your life! This certified organic hemp seed oil can be used for hummus to guacamole to smoothies to pesto. Plus, the oil bottles themselves are made from 50 percent recycled material.

Shop: mountainroseherbs.com, 152 W 5th Ave. #3

Hemp Lip Balm Assortment, $41.58

Lip balm makes the perfect stocking stuffer, and this assortment of 28 tubes and seven flavors offers a one-stop buy for all your closest friends and family. Made with hemp seed oil, rosemary and Vitamin E. Flavors include peppermint, spearmint, orange, lemon lime, cinnamon, vanilla and unscented.

Shop: merryhempsters.com

Organic Dog Salve, $5.25

Don’t forget about your furry friend this holiday season! This pet-friendly, price-friendly dog lotion with soothe cuts, bites or other abrasions. Packaged in a simple, roll on applicator.

Shop: merryhempsters.com

The Little Town That Could(n’t Get On Board With Legal Weed)

words by Delaney Rea | photo by Trevor Meyer

Creswell, Oregon is a small Lane County farming town located about 12 miles south of Eugene with a population of just over 5,000. Creswell is known for its golf course, esteemed farm-to-fork dining scene and proximity to Oregon wine country. Another factor that makes Creswell noteworthy is its staunch objection to the legalization of recreational marijuana sales.

This past August, the Creswell City Council voted unanimously to ban recreational marijuana sales. In November’s Lane County elections, the town once again voted in an 85 percent majority against a ballot measure to overturn the previous ban on recreational sales.

Much of the state supported Measure 91 in 2015, which legalized the sale of recreational marijuana in Oregon. However, not every corner of Oregon has embraced the new legislation. So when a town like Creswell disagrees with state legislature, what does it mean for the tax revenue they receive from the regulated sales run throughout the rest of the state?

The Oregon state tax rate on recreational marijuana is set at 17 percent, with an additional 3 percent possible if a county’s constituents vote in its favor. This means that up to one fifth of the revenue generated through recreational sales in Oregon is going right back into state programs like education, public health, law enforcement and more. Between the starting date of Oregon’s state-level legalization of weed sales in January 2016 and Aug. 31, 2017, the state collected a total of $108.6 million in state and local taxes. About $9.5 million paid for the state’s initial costs to regulate the industry, the remaining revenue was planted into several public sectors. State schools received 40 percent, or $34 million; public health services received 20 percent, or $17 million; the Oregon State Police got a 15 percent cut at $12.75 million; and the Oregon Health Authority brought up the rear with a 5 percent, $4.25 million share.

The amount of money generated from the marijuana tax revenue program was higher than some anticipated. The chief petitioner of Measure 91, Anthony Johnson, recently told the Oregonian that the new law “shows that legalizing and regulating cannabis can help generate revenue for important governmental services.”

This brings the focus back onto communities like Creswell. Oregon is required to disburse the tax revenue from recreational marijuana sales proportionately throughout the state, even to cities and counties that declined to legalize sales. The ratio of funding that a city receives is based on the size of its population. With 5,000 residents, Creswell stands to earn more from weed sales than its less-populous neighbors that supported recreational marijuana sales.

However, the equal disbursement policy only applies to revenue collected before July 1. Any revenue collected after that date won’t got to any city or county like Creswell that disallows recreational marijuana sales.

Ultimately, Creswell citizens are satisfied with their decision not to overturn their city’s ban on marijuana sales. Though the town could stand to benefit from resources given to the education, healthcare and other important public services, it doesn’t appear as though the small town faces any feelings of missing out for the time being. Following the November election, Creswell mayor Dave Stram told the Eugene Register-Guard, “We are Creswell and [we’re] happy to be just who we are.”

2017 Marijuana Recreational Rules & Regulations

by Kelsey Tidball

In 2015, Oregon became the third U.S. state to legalize recreational marijuana. However, since the legalization, the laws and regulations surrounding recreational marijuana use have been complicated, to say the least. As a consumer, it is important to stay up-to-date with the most recent legislation in our state. In order to keep you smart, safe and informed, we have compiled a list of some of the most important legal details.

  1.  Adults 21 and over are legally allowed to grow up to 4 plants at their home without having to notify public officials.
  2.  Adults 21 and over are legally allowed to possess up to 8 ounces of consumable marijuana for personal use in their homes. When not at home, a user may only possess up to 1 ounce.
  3.  Recreational distributors must hold an OLCC (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) recreational marijuana license.
  4.  You may only purchase recreational marijuana from licensed distributors. The OLCC keeps a record of every licensed retail store on their website. Be sure to use this as a resource.
  5.  The legal purchasing limit for an individual consumer is: 1) one ounce of usable marijuana if a recreational consumer, 2) 24 ounces of usable marijuana if a registered OMMP (Oregon Medical Marijuana Program) patient or designated primary caregiver, 3) 16 ounces of a cannabinoid product in solid form, 4) 72 ounces of a cannabinoid product in liquid form, 5) five grams of cannabinoid extracts or concentrates whether sold alone or contained in an inhalant delivery system, 6) four immature marijuana plants, or 7) ten marijuana seeds.
  6.  Recreational users are not permitted to purchase medical grade marijuana. Medical grade marijuana will only be sold to OMMP registered patients.
  7. When travelling, leave your recreational marijuana at home. Because secure areas in airports and airliners are controlled by the federal government, TSA will confiscate any recreational marijuana you try to bring through security. Marijuana is not allowed in checked baggage, carry-ons, or anywhere on your person.
  8. Taking marijuana from one legal state to another is still a federal crime. It is illegal to carry recreational marijuana across state lines, even if both of those states have legalized it.
  9. Users may only consume marijuana in private spaces: your home, a friend’s home, etc. It is illegal to consume marijuana in public, which includes places like hotel and apartment building hallways and lobbies, a front porch or any outside area that is visible to the street, even if it is on your private property, the streets, schools, and public parks.
  10. Public consumption is illegal even if you are using a more discreet device such as a vape pen.
  11. Out-of-state visitors may legally purchase and possess recreational marijuana, but only while they are in Oregon. They will not be able to transport it back to their home state.
  12. Selling marijuana to a person under the age of 21 is a class C felony and is punishable by up to 5 years in prison.
  13. Landlords are given legal right to prohibit cannabis consumption and cultivation on their property.
  14. Riding your bike while under the influence of marijuana is just as illegal as driving while stoned, and may result in an arrest.

Generally, when it comes to recreational marijuana use, it is integral to stay informed. While many states are beginning to systematically decriminalize recreational marijuana use, the laws are still new, and new intricacies are being added all the time. It is possible to be a responsible recreational user, and knowing your rights and your limits will make for a more care-free recreational experience. Be sure to stay updated at oregon.gov/olcc/marijuana, and to do your research whenever you are unsure of the most current recreational rules and regulations.

LivWell Takes Oregon

By Delaney Rea | *Sponsored Content*

Marijuana dispensaries continue to pop up left and right. It’s becoming more and more evident that we’ve reached a fever pitch when it comes to the demand and supply of cannabis. With this many options, the pros and cons of each should be weighed. Are you getting the level of expertise required to make your cannabis shopping experience as successful as possible? The newest addition to Lane County’s dispensary scene aims to provide you with just that.

A family-owned organization, LivWell Enlightened Health began in 2009 with a single medical dispensary in Denver. Following Colorado’s 2014 recreational marijuana legalization, LivWell began catering to a new realm of customers. After expanding into 14 locations in Colorado, LivWell is venturing out to a fifteenth location in Springfield, Oregon.

At LivWell, you’ll find a one-stop-shop for all things cannabis. Not only that, it’s all offered at competitive pricing – which is ideal for college students on a budget. LivWell only stocks products from leading brands in the marijuana industry, which they closely evaluate for quality before setting them on their shelves. LivWell’s in-house cannabis infused products brand, Infusiasm, currently offers a wide range of concentrate, edible and topical products. In 2015, LivWell launched their own line of glass and accessories, Faded by LivWell. That same year, LivWell became the first dispensary to be endorsed by a celebrity when Snoop Dogg teamed up with them to sell his own cannabis line, Leafs by Snoop.

Michael Lord, LivWell’s Director of Business Development, takes pride in the business’ ability to serve consumers from all walks of life.

“In our locations, you’ll find customers representative of the diverse populations we serve, with men and women aged 21 to 65 [and older] regularly patronizing our stores,” Lord says. From first-time users to experienced “cannaseurs,” LivWell is a one-stop shop for everybody. Their popularity among a wide consumer base was earned by turning each employee into a cannabis expert. Every “budtender” undergoes an intensive two-week training program that provides them with all kinds of expertise. They are your resource for everything from the science of cannabis to choosing the best strain for your personal tastes.

LivWell makes your cannabis shopping experience easier with their customer loyalty program, LivWell Rewards. Free to join, the program awards its members points for every purchase. The points can be put toward discounts on non-medicated items in-store. In addition, you’ll receive $10 of store credit just for signing up, and you’ll even earn points on your birthday. Think of it as a punch card that doesn’t stop punching.

LivWell also strives to make their store like home for their customers. “Our budtenders love making personal connections with their customers, and many of them operate on a first-name basis with our consumers,” Lord says. The stores are also designed to be welcoming and relaxing for patrons. Friendly, inviting atmospheres are a major part of the culture that makes LivWell an enticing option for college students. This is far from the sterile, medicinal environments of some dispensaries.

At the end of the day, Lord’s ambitions for LivWell are relatively simple: “Our goal is for every customer to feel comfortable and confident about their cannabis purchase so that they can enjoy the best of what cannabis has to offer.”

LivWell will be opening soon at 2329 Olympic St. in Springfield. They can be reached at 541-357-5230.