420 Tune Guide

written by Renee Thompson @renee.eporita

I have yet to meet a stoner that doesn’t have a go-to album or band to toke to. Some gravitate  more to the traditional sounds, like songs from Bob Marley and the Grateful Dead, and others listen to really out-of-the-box stuff. Either way, all stoners alike  would agree that music and weed go together better than (medicated) peanut butter and jelly. 

For those looking to listen to full albums, I have listed four that are my favorite to listen to while high along with a recommended strain pairing. I’ve also listed 2o of the ultimate 420-themed songs. Songs #1-10 have references to weed in them and songs #11-20 have a certain 420 energy and are visually compelling music videos to watch while high. As an added bonus, to my knowledge every artist besides Masayoshi Tanaka has at least dabbled in cannabis consumption. Hope you enjoy! 

4 Albums You Should Listen To High:

         1. The Rainbow Goblins by Masayoshi Takanaka (Pineapple Upside Down Cake) 

         2. Hit Vibes by Skylar Spence a.k.a. Saint Pepsi (Blueberry Muffin) 

         3. Ugly Cherries by PWR BTTM (Purple Hindu Kush) 

         4. Clandestino by Manu Chao (GG #4) 

20 Songs (10 about weed, 10 from weedos)

  1. Marijuana by Reverend Horton Heat 
  1. I Wanna Smoke by Gangsta Pat 
  1. High Time by Grateful Dead 
  1. Boomer by Bartees Strange
  1. Sweet Leaf by Black Sabbath 
  1. Paper Planes by M.I.A. 
  1. Addicted by Amy Winehouse 
  1. Bam Bam by Sister Nancy 
  1. It’s All Going To Pot by Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard
  1. La Cucaracha by Lila Downs 
  1. Punk Rock Girl by Dead Milkmen
  1. Over Our Heads/Meet Your God by Off 
  1. 私は愛に ハイです by Yung Bae 

 14. Frontier Psychiatrist by The Avalanches 

15. Horse by Salvatore Ganacci 

 16. C’mere by Interpol 

17. Something For Your M.I.N.D. by Superorganism

 18.  The Less I Know the Better by Tame Impala 

 19. Hymnal by Open Mike Eagle 

  20. Weedcard by Garfunkel and Oates 

YouTube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-Rtnwzo7SPU6Ok6r-M6YZAkGuxxfE_Q5

Ultimate Air Fryer Munchies

Written and photographed by Allie Holt

After smoking a bowl, a case of the munchies hits me fast. Immediately I go into the kitchen looking for a quick snack, only to find three ingredients: graham crackers, chocolate and marshmallows. I loved eating s’mores as a kid when camping, but I don’t have a campfire in my apartment. My only s’mores-making tool is my quick and easy air fryer. And when having a case of the munchies, an air fryer is perfect for quick snacks. Ranging from salty to sweet, here are three tried-and-true air fryer snack recipes that are sure to satisfy your munchie cravings. 

  1. Crispy Potato Wedges with Homemade Red Robin Campfire Sauce

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients: 5 small russet potatoes, garlic powder, paprika, salt and pepper,  mayonnaise, barbecue sauce and chipotle powder

If you value savory treats, these potato wedges are meant for you. Begin slicing the potatoes in half lengthwise, creating a wedge shape. Soak your potato wedges in salty ice water for 20 minutes. The salt will add flavor and the water will make the potatoes crispy. After your 20 minutes are up, thoroughly dry the wedges with a paper towel. Preheat your air fryer to 400 degrees and place the wedges into a large bowl. Generously sprinkle garlic powder, paprika, salt and pepper and two tablespoons of olive oil. Shake the oil and seasonings around in the bowl to coat the wedges.

Toss the wedges into the air fryer for 15 minutes, and don’t forget to shake them every five minutes so they cook evenly. While the potatoes fry, you can recreate Red Robin’s famous Campfire sauce. To do this, mix one cup of mayonnaise and barbecue sauce together then sprinkle a teaspoon of chipotle powder. Stir it all together and you’ve made a delicious, smokey dipping sauce for your crispy potato wedges!

  1. Cinnamon Apple Crisps

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Prep Time: 10 minutes

This recipe is easy, healthy and satisfying for your sweet tooth. All you need is one apple of any flavor and cinnamon. Slice your apple into thin slices and sprinkle each slice with cinnamon. Minimally overlap the slices in the air fryer and place the metal rack on top to keep the slices from blowing around. Flip the slices every five minutes for ultimate crispiness at 300 degrees until the 15 minutes are up. Enjoy your fried cinnamon apple slices after a morning wake and bake session or as a post workout snack!

  1. Sloppy S’mores

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients: Large Hershey’s chocolate bar, graham crackers and marshmallows

If you’re a fan of chocolate, these sloppy s’mores will please your late night craving for sweets without a campfire. Split your graham crackers and marshmallows in half, then place the marshmallows onto each cracker. Firmly place the sticky marshmallow side onto an empty cracker, and place in the air fryer for five minutes at 390 degrees. After your five minutes are up, remove the crackers and top with two squares of a Hershey’s chocolate bar. The chocolate will begin to melt on top of the warm marshmallow, creating a sloppy and tasty midnight snack!

Instead of running to the market to grab on the go snacks, pull out your air fryer and give one of these recipes a try! 

Budtender Spotlight: Moniker Gee

Written and photographed by Annie McVay 

  1. What inspired you to work in the cannabis industry?

I actually had a friend that said I should try it out. And I have partaken in cannabis for a long time, so I’ve definitely seen a lot of benefits for myself. To even have this as a job is kind of like pretty surreal. I enjoy working with stuff that aligns with my morals, like plant medicine, and something so natural. Hearing customers come back and be like, “I have chronic pain, and I use this lotion every night, and it’s made such a difference!” Just hearing that is really heart-warming and inspiring to see that what I’m doing can make a difference in people’s quality of life.

  1. Would you say that cannabis is a viable natural medicine?

Oh yeah, most definitely it’s one of the best, and it’s sad that we don’t get that recognition. It is so helpful, and everyday I’m reminded of how people use it for medicine. That’s probably my favorite part of the job. Getting people off pharmaceuticals and hearing cannabis got them off so many pills and stuff. I’m just like, yes! This is so much better for you! 

  1. How different do you feel being a budtender is compared to other customer service positions?

I think that it’s a bit more personal of an interaction. You’re not just going into the store and buying groceries to cook food. You are coming in with a purpose, whether that’s to have fun, or to help you sleep, to help pain, anxiety, or just relax at the end of a long day.

  1. What are some benefits you’ve noticed from recreational cannabis being available?

Unlike Oregon, many states have police who are still trying to regulate something so minute. Like, cannabis is a plant that people are doing recreationally. I think that overall it’s better that Oregon can focus on more devastating substances to crack down on. That’s definitely one of the things I would say is a benefit to having legalized cannabis, and also the fact that people have the opportunity to treat any ailments. They feel that cannabis is helping them. And doing it in a safe way that’s not illegal and kind of in their control. It’s not like a shady deal on the street. They can come into a store and feel welcomed and heard and that there’s a variety of options for them to try. 

  1. What is one of your favorite strains?

I’m definitely into more heavy, sedative strains. I would say Granddaddy Purple or Purple Punch are two of my favorites.

  1. Do you have a favorite farm or brand?

I really like Oregrown. Some of their flowers have been some of the most beautiful nugs I’ve ever seen, and I totally enjoy their concentrates.

  1. How do you prefer to consume cannabis?

It really depends on what I’m looking for. If I’m having a bad back day and a lot of pain, I tend to go for tinctures or edibles. I like a lot of the one-to-ones or two-to-ones with CBD and THC being combined. I find a lot of relief from that. But if it’s just for fun and relaxing, I would say probably smoking flower or dabbing. I definitely prefer indica, sometimes sativas can heighten my senses, but indicas tend to relax my pain the best.

  1. What activities do you enjoy while partaking in cannabis?

I love to be outside in nature. Hiking, that’s probably my favorite thing to do while smoking. Mount Pisgah has got a lot of nice trails, locally. I tend to go to a lot of different trails each time. Spencer Butte is another good one. There’s a lot of waterfall hikes, like Upper Trestle Creek Falls, too.

  1. What advice do you have for customers celebrating 420 for the first time?

I would say if you’re a light user to go slow and don’t go too hard too fast. If you’re partaking in edibles, you can always eat more, but you can’t eat less, so that’s a good piece of advice I like to share. And remember your body takes quite some time to digest THC. I hate hearing about people that don’t know they’re not supposed to eat the whole thing, and they have a really hard time even days after. I don’t want people to have that experience, so I think if you are a beginner user, start small and have the day off.

  1. What is a favorite munchie of yours?

Cinnamon Toast Crunch with non-dairy milk at night is my go-to high snack. Or I’ll do a weird combo of peanut butter jelly and coconut oil, just in a bowl. Like PB&J without the bread. It’s reminiscent of my childhood.

  1. What are your thoughts on waste and sustainability in the cannabis industry?

I’ve seen a lot of waste. That’s the hardest thing I’ve been shown about this industry. I would like people and the OLCC to change their policies and habits. Some things you can do that would help would be bringing back your child proof bags to reduce the amount of plastic. Same with reusable flower containers. Some shops will take those and reuse them, or P3 is a recycling company that actually turns their plastic into prosthetics if I’m not mistaken. It’s a really nice way for these containers to not end up in landfills. I think it’s going to have to start with the public realizing how much plastic is going out. Because alcohol and cigarettes do not have to be child proof they don’t have as much waste. Those are just as damaging, if not more, to a little kid, in my opinion. I really think that could help the industry and our world a lot if we try to put more of that focus out there. This earth is providing this amazing plant medicine, and we need to take care of her, so we can keep having this available to us. In the future, we can start using hemp instead of plastic. It’s biodegradable, it’s affordable since we’re already producing it. We’re trying to cut costs, but we’re going to be paying for that in the long run.

  1. Are there efficient ways to recycle cannabis packaging materials currently? 

I think some people put their containers in the recycling at home, and they cannot be recycled that way, so that’s something to be aware of. Find a dispensary that’ll take them back. You can always give them a call, and hopefully, they can reuse them or find a second life for them. From what I’m learning, I think we need to use our voices when it comes to big corporations because they’re in charge of putting all this waste out there. A lot of pressure is put on the consumer and the individual, but realistically speaking, these companies are putting out a lot more chemical pollution and waste into this world, just for money. We need to tell them we need a change. 

  1. What’s something you wish more customers knew? 

    I think that it would be beneficial for consumers to know more about cannabis, and I hope that people will start asking budtenders things. There’s a lot more than just numbers, but we live in a very number-fixated world. People educating themselves can be beneficial for the future, try new things and find what works best for them. There’s a lot of good stuff out there. There’s a synergistic effect with the other cannabinoids besides just THC. The benefits that these cannabinoids can have for us are super important. Everyone’s body is so different, so what works for you might not work for me and vice versa. It’s about listening to learning from our bodies.

Do you have anyone to recommend for our Budtender Spotlight? Tell us about them @greeneugenemag!

Cannabis and the Environment

Written by Alexandra Arnett

You may notice a lot of farms throwing around the term ‘sustainable farming’, but what does that actually mean? Sustainability is defined as the avoidance of the depletion of natural resources in order to maintain an ecological balance. But is sustainability really sustainable? The purpose of sustainability is to maintain. Maintaining what was already there is simply not enough when looking at the bigger picture. As hard as we may try to maintain, the biodiversity of the planet is still suffering from our actions, thus we must make efforts to restore this biodiversity. Methods such as regenerative farming include taking part in a diverse bioecological system and giving back to the earth. Practices include planting complementary plants alongside your cannabis, growing various crops in the offseason to protect the soil, composting, using natural soil and avoiding chemical additives. Some farms have even been successful in dry farming cannabis plants which means they don’t use supplemental irrigation systems for their plants. Now, in a place like Oregon, this may produce cannabis that ends up molding, but for drier climates, this practice does show some promise.

Regarding “organic” cannabis farming, the USDA actually does not certify any cannabis as organic as it is illegal under federal law. Hemp, on the other hand, can obtain a USDA Organic certification. In an effort to obtain similar “organic” certification for cannabis farms, various organizations have been established that helps to ensure farms follow specific “sustainable” standards. Some of these organizations that work with farms in Oregon include Dragonfly Earth Medicine, Certified-Kind, Sun+Earth Certified and Clean Green Certified. Each organization has different requirements for getting certified and some are more stringent than others in regard to certain farming practices. [The various rules for each are linked above.] There are also a number of farms that make claims about having “organic” practices, but the reality is that we can’t be certain. In addition, everyone has their own idea of what “organic cannabis” looks like. Farms should make an effort to practice regenerative farming methods in order to give back to the earth.

I know we would all like to think that growing cannabis does no harm to the planet. But the reality is that growing cannabis in a way that benefits the environment wholly takes much more effort than simply choosing to grow outdoors. There are three main environments in which cannabis is commercially grown: indoor, outdoor and light-deprivation greenhouse. Some farms just grow cannabis using one of these methods, others may implement multiple methods if accessible. Typically, cannabis plants are grown in soil, either directly in the ground or in a planter pot. However, indoor cannabis growing operations may often use a hydroponic method of growing. Hydroponic growing involves suspending the roots of the plants in buckets of water and a medium such as perlite or coconut fiber.

Out of all the growing methods, outdoor growing is the one that would require the least energy and water. Greenhouse growing methods are also another good choice if you may be dealing with inclement weather for growing cannabis. Indoor growing and hydroponic methods are the most wasteful, in both energy and water consumption, especially when the methods are combined. If you want to choose the best method for the environment, growing cannabis in the earth’s natural soil provides a number of benefits to the earth and uses the sun rather than artificial lighting and energy.

While there is an overall lack of research on the effect indoor cannabis cultivation may be having on the environment, in 2020, one researcher Evan Mills published an in-depth follow-up study to a 2012 paper on cannabis energy use and cost. According to his data, indoor cannabis cultivation produces up to 15 million metric tonnes of CO2 per year and can cost upwards of $6 million a year. To compare this, Oregonians produce around 20 million metric tonnes per year in transportation emissions. However, there are ways to mitigate some of the negative effects of indoor cannabis cultivation there are a few steps that can be taken. Implementing things such as renewable energy sources, LED lighting, reusing water through reverse osmosis and even collecting rainwater for use are all ways indoor cannabis cultivators can help lessen their impact on the environment. 

Let us not forget though that there can be negative effects to the consumer if cannabis is grown in less than ideal environmental conditions. Not only does cannabis pull toxins out of the soil it is grown in, when it is grown outdoors there is a chance for dirt and other allergens to contaminate the plant. Overall, knowing your grow is the most important thing you can do to ensure you are getting the most quality product on the market.

Drowning in Plastic: A guide to canna-recycling

written by Skyla Patton, photographed by Lily Brennan 

Do you remember the saying, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”? Thrifters know this to be a time-honored truth, but it also works in reverse: something that starts as treasure can easily become trash, too easily these days as we find ourselves drowning in plastic and other waste amid a climate crisis. The cannabis industry is famous for innovation and resourcefulness, but anyone who’s ever stepped foot inside a dispensary knows that it’s one that relies heavily on plastic and disposable products. The collection of single-use joint tubes piling up in the corner of my bedroom accuses me every time I add another to the mountain. Here are a few user-friendly ways to make your consumption habits even more eco-friendly. 

First and foremost, check recycling access near you 

While we can’t toss our cannabis-plastics into SANIPAC or APEX bins quite yet, there are still options for recycling things like joint tubes or cartridges depending on your area. Here in Eugene and Springfield, there are plenty of dispensaries that will accept clean, label-free joint and flower tubes for recycling or refilling with your latest purchase. It’s always a good idea to call first and ask prior to bringing in your bags of recyclables, just to make sure you’re heading to the right place with your haul. Bonus Tip: The fastest way to remove labels from tubes is to soak them. Fill your sink with hot, soapy water and submerge your joint or flower tubes to soak for 10-15 minutes, or until labels are easily peeled off. If residue persists, use the rough side of a sponge to scrub it off. 

Keep exit bags in your car for easy access 

I never remember to bring my reusable grocery bags into the store unless they’re right in front of me, so to fix that problem, I store them in the back seat so I have to see them before I go in. The same rule of thumb applies for the child-safe exit bags we get our cannabis goodies in, a mandatory part of the shopping process but a plastic-creator nevertheless. Keeping one large exit bag in your car (or buying a reusable cloth exit bag to make it personal and stylish) will help you remember to rely on that, and prevent another pile of plastic packaging from growing in your home. 

Seek out sustainable brands to put your money where your anxiety is 

When it comes to issues like single-use cartridges or product packaging, there isn’t a good way to sugarcoat things: it’s wasteful, and we’ve got to work together on a solution to come up with something better than what we’re currently working with. That could look like calling local representatives about cannabis laws, getting involved in the Oregon Cannabis Commission, or even just having meaningful conversations about how to address cannabis waste with your peers. In the meantime, you can also have a direct impact by favoring sustainable products and brands when you shop. Ask your budtender which products have the seal of eco-friendly approval, or do some background research before your next dispo trip to see which companies have made commitments to certain environmental goals or mission statements with a sustainable focus. 

When all else fails, make some rose colored glasses 

The easiest and sometimes most creative way to lower your plastic waste from your cannabis endeavors is to reuse all of it in a newer, better way rather than tossing it in the trash. Pop tops and joint tubes? Clean them out and repurpose into storage for office supplies, vitamins, snacks on the go, homemade joints or blunts, pens or pencils, the list goes on and on. Glass jars? Storage for future nugs, herbs, jewelry, loose change, heck, whatever you want to put in there. I recently saw a Pinterest board of all the different ways to use cannabis-containers for all your plant and propagation needs, with jars as succulents pots and pop tops as seed starters. Grab bags could carry sandwiches to-go or turn into a DIY first aid kit to keep in the car. Gather your favorite art supplies, your best creativity-inducing strain  and start repurposing to your heart’s content. Saving the planet and boosting your serotonin, all in one project. 

High Recommendations: Medicated Bath Salts

Written and photographed by Renee Thompson

When I begin to feel the weight of stress on my bones, I always gravitate toward taking a long shower or bath. The mix of water and steam always helps me re-center and feel refreshed. When using medicated bath salts, soaks are even more relaxing. The medicated ingredients can help soothe muscles and nerves. Compared to normal bath salts, depending on the amount of activated ingredients used, one could experience a slight tingly sensation because of the skin’s super absorbent nature. Which is why it is important, not just for the environment, but also for the sake of your own health that you pay attention to the ingredients in bath and beauty products. One thing that I have been doing for the past year is consciously buying products that are better for the environment. I found it very easy to switch to plastic free shampoo and conditioner, and have since started looking into how I can cut out other environmentally harmful products. 

Bath and beauty products can contain microplastics that return to our water supply after you wash your face or body. Microplastics are not usually filtered out of water, since they are so small, but they can have a damaging effect on your health and our shared environment. The Australian Department of Water and the Environment states that microplastics that exist in the environment can negatively affect humans, animals, plant life, and the environment itself. After microplastics have been introduced to the marine environment, they can absorb more toxins and can become even more harmful by carrying those toxins up and down the food chain. Even though Congress passed the Microbead Free Water Act in 2015, the act only classifies microbeads as, “any solid plastic particle that is less than five millimeters in size and is intended to be used to exfoliate or cleanse the human body or any part thereof” even through microplastics can be found outside the over-the-counter bath and beauty aisle. The act seems to only target exfoliating microbeads, and doesn’t offer a clear solution for filtering already existing microplastics out of the water supply.

In this recipe, baking soda is used as a cleanser, while Epsom salt works to help reduce soreness. When using this recipe, I like to use Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt, since its larger flakes work great for exfoliation. I tend to keep decarboxylated stems/shake on hand, but if you are unfamiliar with the process make sure that you heat up your active ingredients on a cookie sheet for 40 mins at 240F. This is also another great reason to save your shake and stems as they can be used instead of pricier premium flower. Of course the higher the THC and CBD in the flower used will affect the potency of the end product, so try and pay attention to those percentages when buying, especially if you are someone who is prone to paranoia. 

Medicated Bath Salts

Prep Time: 5-10 mins

Yield: 1 cup

         Ingredients-

                     1/3 cup baking soda

                     1/3 cup salt

                     1/3 cup Epsom salt

                     1-4 Tbsp medicated coconut oil

                     4-5 drops of essential oil

                     2-4 tps decarboxylated stems and shake

         Tools-

                     1 metal spoon

                     1 medium bowl

                     measuring cup

                     measuring spoons

                     holding container (ex: Mason jar, old flower container, etc.)

         Directions-

1. Measure out the baking soda, salt, and Epsom salt and mix them together in the bowl.

2. Warm up coconut oil in the microwave or on a low on the stovetop.

3. Add the decarboxylated stems/shake and medicated coconut oil to the mixture.

4. Mix well, add essential oil (optional) and mix again.

5. With the spoon, place the medicated bath salt into your container of choice.

6. Add anywhere from 3-6 Tbsp to warm bath or 1-3 Tbsp for a small foot bath or body scrub. Enjoy!

Seth Rogen: Weeds Renaissance Man

featured image pottery by Kaylynn Wohl as inspired by Rogen

Written by Kaylynn Wohl

If anyone champions weed within the celebrity light, it’s Seth Rogen. Since breaking out from his late adolescent role in Freaks and Geeks, we’ve seen him in stoner comedies like Pineapple Express and Superbad with his contagious and blazed whole-bellied chuckle. He step-by-step taught us the ways of the cross joint and gifted us with “Bound 3,” a sensual parody featuring his close friend James Franco. The cannabis community is now witnessing Rogen’s evolutionary creations outside of cinema culture with his new (to the United States) company Houseplant.

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg’s cannabis lifestyle brand launched two years ago in Canada. With simplicity in mind, they started with three flower strains: sativa strains Pancake Ice (33.32% THC) and Diablo Wind (26.29% THC) and indica strain Pink Moon (26.45% THC). Eighths of an ounce of Houseplant’s strains are suggested at $60 and are currently available in California through delivery services. The strains come in unique aesthetically pleasing containers that accompany info graphics and oversized striking matches. 

“All our strains are named after weather systems like we did with Pineapple Express,” Rogen described in a Twitter thread. 

The ‘house’ aspect of the brand entails weedy house goods from luxury table top lighters, car lighters, vinyl record sets, and even ceramic ashtrays and vases designed by Rogen himself. A triple LP vinyl box set was catered to the individual experiences of sativa, indica and hybrid strains to create a unique sound experience. Each session reflects the beat and vibrations of whatever mood is smoked. Despite the $95 price tag, fans of both Rogen and cannabis have raved with positive reviews. To combat the frequent site crashes and quick product sell outs after the initial launch, Houseplant offered users to enter an email address to be notified with a designated access link that had a 10 minute grace period.  

While Canada legalized cannabis in 2016, the fight continues in the US as acknowledged by the company’s website impact page. Houseplant’s ethics and political standpoints are made clear through deliberate discourse surrounding the environmental impact and the ongoing legal battles within the cannabis industry. Supporting any cannabis company that openly discusses injustices and imbalances within the industry feels just as good as smoking the strains themselves.

“We feel strongly about educating people about cannabis, a plant we love and believe substantially benefits society. We will always use our platform to educate people about the devastating history of the War on Drugs and help end the senseless, racist cannabis laws that, despite progress, still exist today. We won’t stop until every adult in America is able to enjoy cannabis without fear of being labeled a criminal,” reads the Houseplant website. 

In more recent years, fans of Rogen’s acting career have additionally been able to adapt their support towards his artistic pottery endeavors. This stoner’s connection to the herbal earth, fostered by loving cannabis, has expanded through connecting his hands to the earth material of clay. This passion for ceramic art pours over into Rogen’s fans who previously may not have expressed interest in pottery. The global ceramic culture and community benefit from this artist’s teachings of the alchemical world of clay. 

As a fellow ceramicist (or pothead if you will) I have witnessed immense growth in Rogen’s pottery. The evolution of his ashtrays is an inspiring phenomenon where I’ve even created similar pieces out of awe for his clayed mind. His signature style includes a short cup shape ashtray with a two-to-three inch-long tray added to the lip for easy secured display for any stick-shaped smoke. He provides a walk-through on how he creates these pieces on his Instagram, leaving out secrets only other potters can spot. After mastering these designs with over a year’s practice, Rogen has since created molds in order to mass produce his unique ashtray set. Pottery molds for slip casting are created with plaster where liquid clay is poured in then out to create a shell of the desired shape. 

Rogen’s exploration of sculpting bodacious vases and vessels melds with psychedelic glazes in highlighter hues. Required by a deep understanding of raw chemical interactions, some of his colored creations vibrantly replicate heat maps and splattered zombie vomit. Instances where the unglazed portions of the vessel pop with electrifying color are created by wedging oxides into the raw clay body. Rogen’s particular methods have been vaguely shared with his audience while his pottery updates usually only accompany a brief caption of “I made these.”

Aside from all the aforementioned dope shit this Canadian-American cannabis influencer has provided the weed community, Rogen wrote a book called Yearbook which is scheduled to be released in May. This novel is a series of true stories and humorous essays that I imagine will pair excellently with my blunt of Blue Dream. 

Strain of The Month: Granddaddy Purple

Written and photographed by Annie McVay 

Granddaddy Purple is a #strainofthemonth designed to impress the senses, especially considering the fruity and sweet floral notes. From nearly a foot away, you can still smell this glimmering nug like a fragrant indica flower. Granddaddy Purple has surprisingly bright green, dense nugs, yet goes through the grinder smoothly, further releasing the distinctive and delightful aroma. The plethora of crystals sparkling in the light and the bunches of orange pistils make this strain an absolutely stunning sight to behold.

From local family farm Cannassentials, Granddaddy Purple is the outcome of Mendo Purps and a Skunk and Afghanistan crossover. The top terpenes of this indica strain are linalool and limonene. Also found in birch bark and lavender, linalool is known for creating a floral aroma and promoting a calming and soothing effect. Linalool may also help encourage decongestion, a perfect boost to the immune system when the pollen levels rise dramatically in spring. Interestingly enough, linalool is found in over 200 plants, and even those who do not use cannabis can consume over two grams a year.

Originating in the flower’s resin glands, limonene creates the other half of this strain’s particularly fruity and citrusy aroma. Limonene is also found in juniper, lemon rinds, and orange rinds and contains mood enhancing and anti-anxiety properties. Lab studies of high doses of limonene have also discovered many anti-cancer characteristics, causing tumor cell death in breast, lung and brain cancers. Along with antifungal and antibacterial properties, limonene can even help with gastric reflux and heartburn.

After a long day of running errands, scrambling to finish applications, and writing essays, Granddaddy Purple is the perfect way to unwind. This strain is delightfully delicious and smooth to smoke, whether using a piece or rolling a blunt with the roommates. At a THC level averaging around 22.95%, this is a hard-hitting strain for those who don’t smoke often, so please use your best judgment. However, this is not an anxiety inducer, as all your worries simply melt away. Perfect for enjoying some Cards Against Humanity with friends, this is a great strain to have on hand for any 4/20 celebration. Even smoking alone, Granddaddy Purple makes any comedic or creative activity much more engaging and enjoyable.  

Granddaddy Purple is available from Cannabis LLC, located at 1936 Main St, Springfield, Oregon. Accessing the parking lot is a breeze while driving West on Main street, and inside the store is divided into two halves, so even in the era of COVID-19 customers can admire interesting glass pieces and other odds and ends while disinfecting and waiting their turn. The budtenders here have charming personalities and provide exceptional customer service. Whether you get the Granddaddy Purple or prefer a different strain for this spring, you will be in good hands at Cannabis LLC. 

Do you have any flower favorites to recommend for strain of the month? Tell us about it @greeneugenemag!

Too High: Edible nightmares, fever dreams and more

Collected and written by Kimberly Harris 

Kaylynn W. 

I ate a whole homemade marshmallow cereal ball edible and within an hour I was having an existential crisis, like having a sense of identity was super uncomfortable. I was looking at photos of myself and it was too much, I had to put down all my frames. I looked into my mirror and asked myself “who is this?”  and I laid fully clothed on my bed and started looking up at my ceiling. That’s when I started to see the world around me become glitchy, so I turned my gaze to the next wall, and I started to see three elves. They were about 3 ft tall with pointy hats, and they were whispering to each other because they saw me noticing them. I’ve never done DMT, but my experience was like a whole DMT experience. When I told people this story, they said that’s exactly what people see on DMT, like elves and stuff.

Madison R. 

It was my freshman year of college, and I  lived in the dorms with my best friend who was a really big stoner. My roommate said she was getting edibles from a friend and asked if I wanted one. I was down, and she brought home two small M&M cookies. Before she could even say anything, I scarfed mine down. I popped the whole cookie in my mouth because I thought that’s what we were supposed to do. My roommate looked at me with wide eyes, I’ll never forget the look on her face, and in shock while she explained that I was only supposed to eat a quarter of the edible. She apologized and advised me to stay in the dorm until it kicked in before she headed out to class. I decided to nap it off but when I woke up it hit me. I was totally hallucinating, seeing colors and shapes. I was super high all night. I also had horrible vivid nightmares and hallucinations. Ever since that moment I’ve never tried edibles again. 

Kaeden W. 

I had just started smoking and someone I knew made edibles, so I took one from them. I had never done an edible before, so I took the whole thing. I blacked out, and I haven’t blacked out from weed since then. I vaguely remember making butter noodles and not being able to communicate with my friend who also took an edible. I then shuffled two blocks home and it felt like it took two hours. There was so much THC in that edible that I was high for 24 hours, like violently high. I learned to never take the whole edible and always test the waters first.

Anonymous

A couple summers ago I was helping my then girlfriend move from SoCal up to Oregon. We stayed a night in Redding with her aunt, and her aunt wasn’t 420-friendly, but we still wanted to get high that evening. Edibles were the answer, or so we thought. Since we were both pretty unfamiliar with edible dosages, we decided it would be a good idea to split a super potent 350 mg cookie between the two of us. It wasn’t a good idea. Instead of having a fun, stoney night in a little forest cabin we spent the evening staring at the ceiling, uncomfortably melting into the mattress and trying not to yack. We couldn’t fall asleep for the longest time, but we had plans to leave earlier the next morning to Portland. Needless to say, that didn’t happen. We ended up sleeping until noon the next day and woke up to her mom calling us asking why we haven’t left for Oregon yet. Eventually we made it out of the cabin and up to our destination, but neither of us have taken an edible like that since. 

Skyla P 

One edible I took during a camping trip KO’d me and a few friends so good we couldn’t get up to make s’mores for hours (or what felt like hours) because we all knew we’d fall over or float away if we stood up and ended up just staring into the fire forever. We woke up the next morning and realized that the s’mores supplies were right behind us the whole time—maybe an arm’s reach away? I think it was from HUSH but all I really remember was how cool the stars looked between the trees. Nature rocks.

Jyles L.          

I was at 7/11 buying something and I was staring at the cashier for hella long but the machine was asking me for my pin and I legit zoned out. 

Anonymous 

I was so excited to celebrate 4/20 one year that I bought a whole bunch of edibles for me and my friend. She didn’t smoke or really do anything cannabis related, but when I invited her over to take an edible and chill on the stoner holiday, she was down. We were cheerfully catching up and enjoying ourselves as we waited for the edibles to kick in. I was totally chilling by the time the high set in, but my friend was not. She was laying on her back, holding her stomach and said that she felt sick and nauseous. I tried to help her out, but she ended up puking and next to my toilet for the rest of the night. I felt horrible for giving my friend something like that, and also for ruining a cannabis experience for her. Now, I don’t offer my edibles and cannabis goodies unless I know the person is a stoner lol. 

Madison I. 

It was my first experience with weed ever, and I took a homemade Fruity Pebbles Rice Krispie edible. My partner and I went to the beach and rented a room and had planned this whole weekend. When eating it I definitely didn’t care for the taste and only had a couple bites. At first, I was denying that I was high because I couldn’t tell at first. Then I started hallucinating and saw my partner floating into outer space. I swore there were bugs crawling all over him. These hallucinations continued for a few hours and then I ate a bunch of Chinese food and slept for like 12 hours. I definitely woke up the next day still high and we went to breakfast and toured around the town. It was quite difficult being a newbie. 

Anonymous

The first time I ever got high was when I first toured UO. It was the spring of my senior year and I was pretty set on attending but wanted to see the campus first. I drove to Eugene with my best friend, and stayed with her older sister who was a senior at the time. She gave us a tour of the school and asked if we wanted to get high that evening, and we obviously said yes. I remember driving to Safeway beforehand and stocking up on munchies, then going back to her house and going up to the roof to smoke. Her bong was made out of an old Grey Goose bottle and it was (to me at the time) MASSIVE.  We obviously had no idea how to use it, so she was lighting it for us, so she was lighting it for us and doing all the legwork. We sat up on the roof for maybe an hour and I felt absolutely nothing. My best friend was high, everyone else was high except for me and I thought something was wrong with me. My friend’s sister said ‘sometimes people just don’t get high the first time they smoke.’ I’ve literally never heard anyone say this except for her lol. We stood up to go downstairs and it hit me all at once like a train. My legs felt rubbery and I remember standing at the top of the stairs and wondering how I would get down hahaha. The rest of the night was pretty laid back: we sank into the couch and watched Brain Games, the most mind-bending show we could think of. I think we both sat there with our eyes glued to the TV for like three hours while my friend’s sister and her roommates came and went and did their own thing. I had such a nice time, I decided that night to commit to UO and the rest was history!

What’s the Buzz on Delta-8-THC?

Written by Alexandra Arnett @calyx.alex

Delta-8-THC has gained a lot of popularity recently, with products like vape cartridges and edibles being sold through numerous online sources and even being offered in CBD retail stores across the country. Delta-8-THC, like delta-9-THC, does bind to the CB1 receptor but much less so than delta-9-THC. It is important to remember that just like people’s bodies respond differently to delta-9-THC, they also respond differently to delta-8-THC so we can’t say for sure just how potent of a high it may be producing in some individuals. Research has identified that delta-8-THC does have several benefits, including having anti-nausea, anti-anxiety, appetite-stimulation, pain-relieving and neuroprotective properties. 

There can be some confusion regarding the legality of delta-8-THC. When produced by cannabis, delta-8-THC is federally illegal, but when delta-8-THC is derived from hemp it is considered by some to be federally legal. But, there is also the federal Analogue Act which states that if a substance is chemically similar to a Scheduled substance then it can be treated as such. Delta-8-THC is an analog of THC and while it is naturally produced by the cannabis species, it is not typically found in significant levels.

Through a process called “isomerization,” you are able to convert CBD to delta-8-THC or even to delta-9-THC. Without having to go into too much detail, this process involves mixing isolated 99% CBD with an acidic catalyst and heating it. This process may be producing unsafe byproducts that could be harmful to someone’s health. The majority of delta-8-THC on the market is made using this process of isomerization. However, there are currently 11 states that have banned the sale of delta-8-THC; Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, Rhode Island and Utah.

Oregon doesn’t necessarily regulate online and other storefront sales on the general market, and this may put consumers at risk. However, this is likely to be changing for the state of Oregon as the OLCC recently issued a statement that they will be considering regulating all sales and production of delta-8-THC. In their statement, they mention that although there may be delta-8-THC products on the regulated market currently, this was an oversight on their behalf and delta-8-THC is in fact prohibited under the Division 25 rules due to how they are produced and because it does increase potency.

845-025-3220 General Processor Requirements (3) A processor may not treat or otherwise adulterate a cannabinoid product, concentrate or extract with any additive or substance that would increase potency, toxicity or addictive potential, or that would create an unsafe combination with other psychoactive substances. Prohibited additives or substances include but are not limited to nicotine, caffeine, polyethylene glycol, or any chemicals that increase carcinogenicity or cardiac effects.

It is recommended against obtaining any Delta-8-THC products until more regulations can be implemented. As much as we don’t like the idea of regulations, there are many that have been put in place in order to protect us from the greed of unsavory companies. Overall, more research is needed on the safety of inhaling and ingesting delta-8-THC that was processed from CBD. Because delta-8-THC does show promise for certain ailments, there is absolutely an opportunity for product development when more research can be conducted.