A Literal Sleeper: Purple Hindu Kush

words by Julio Jaquez

A cross between Hindu Kush and Purple Afghani, two infamous strains that hail from the mountainous ranges that divide Afghanistan and Pakistan, emerged the beauty we know as Purple Hindu Kush. Nearly identical to its parental lineage, Purple Hindu Kush provides a sense of relaxation that rids the body of any stressors in the mind. The dense, spongy and frosted flower is glittered with trichomes and it’s orange pistils are accentuated by the lavender color that is spread throughout the bud. Reminiscent of an Oregon winery, its sour pungent aroma is paired perfectly with an earthy-like taste or rich flavors, like dark chocolate.

Recognized and well-known, the specific variety that is Kush is often associated with its roots and reputation for a heavy kick. The origins of Kush cannabis produce a kind of high that is distinct and powerful. Strains intermingled with Kush are known for their potency and play a big role in the well known “couch lock effect”. Labeled a Top 10 Kush by High Times in 2016, Purple Hindu Kush is sure to relax you beyond belief. Be prepared to be soothed and lulled into a sweet state of calm. If you tend to be anxious, this strain will help you to wave goodbye to all of your worries. With the potential to derail an entire day,  Purple Hindu Kush earns our “Strain of the Month” recognition for March.

In 2009, Republican Congressman Mark Kirk of Illinois noticed the zombie-like effects it had and proposed a bill to increase criminal penalties when referencing to the infamous Kush strain — a testament to how intense it’s effects can be. Although it (probably) won’t turn you into a zombie, Purple Hindu Kush is not a strain to mess around with if something needs to be accomplished. This indica is destined to be paired with finally arriving home after a long day, unwinding and unstrapping those anxiety-induced bootstraps. So go home, find the best spot to sink in on the couch, and light up with this relaxation station: Purple Hindu Kush.

Cannabis on Campus: Flush It!

words by Bryan Dorn
photos by Destiny Alvarez

Cannabis rules at the University of Oregon are outlined in the code of conduct as a zero tolerance policy; however, with the growing popularization of recreational cannabis and the recent requirement for first year students to live on campus, keeping cannabis off campus can prove to be difficult.

During the Fall of 2017 over 150 cannabis related incident reports were issued in resident halls and on campus, according to Assistant Director of Resident Life Shelby Wieners. This begs the question, what happens when students get caught with cannabis on campus?

This academic year, the residence halls have updated their policies to be less punitive and more centralized around education following cannabis related incident reports, Wieners says.

“Looking at how cannabis is handled on campus was very different than how we handled alcohol— when in the state of Oregon the laws are pretty similar,” says Wieners. “But the way that we approached it just wasn’t similar and I felt that was inequitable to students.”

Resident advisors are now requiring students, who are found with a ‘personal amount’ of cannabis, to flush the product and hand over their paraphernalia without getting the University of Oregon Police Department involved. In previous years, UOPD would be called to initiate contact with residents and confiscate the cannabis and paraphernalia themselves.

Now, the paraphernalia is put in a lock box for UOPD to confiscate at a later time.

“Our conduct process is educationally designed and is not the criminal process,” Wieners says. “So having RAs facilitate this and not having UOPD go to every single cannabis call realigns our response to how we say we educate students.”

Depending on the severity, context and frequency of the incidents, students who are found responsible for policy violations, like possession of cannabis in the dormitories, can expect a range of sanctions from community involvement to expulsion, according to Wieners.

Between fall 2017 and fall 2018 there was a 23% reduction in cannabis related incident report submissions through University Housing. According to Wieners, this could be due to students receiving more in depth information on community expectations and curriculum or shifting attitudes between graduating classes.

While the new policy on campus may seem straightforward, there are some grey areas. The amount of cannabis that is deemed personal possession is based on a “flushable amount,” according to Wieners. If RAs find what they deem an excessive amount they call professional staff with University Housing and take the incident from there.

The policy also does not include non-THC cannabinoids such as CBD. Medical students are still forbidden from having their medicine on campus due to federal regulations, Wieners says.

Students who need access to medical cannabis and are required to live on campus are encouraged to contact the Accessible Education Center and the University Counseling Center to find a solution with the University.

“Students aren’t a mass of beings right? Everyone is an individual and so looking at each individual case is really important,” Wieners says. “We would rather process a situation and talk about it than make a decision in a vacuum. Because every case is different.”

This shift in policy has inevitably lead to more University Housing involvement with cannabis incidents on campus and less UOPD involvement.

Most cases of cannabis on campus are now being logged as conduct violations rather than criminal violations. According to Kelly McIver, Public Information Officer for UOPD, the police department does not want students to incur hefty fines or deal with long term legal trouble due to small issues that can be addressed with education.

Because the university is federally funded, cannabis use and possession is strictly forbidden on all university affiliated properties, according to McIver. However, officers are not going out of their way to sniff out stoners.

“I think it’s better for everybody because it allows police to focus on not only addressing more serious crimes that may be occurring, but also spend more time out on patrol where their visibility and presence can be a deterrent to more serious crime,” McIver says.

In the future, students who are found with a personal amount of cannabis on campus can rest easy knowing the university is not looking to take legal action or derail their education. If students who are breaking the rules on campus comply with the Residence Halls, then the new rules on campus can foster a safer and more educational learning environment.

Cannabis Changed My Life: A Journey to Cannabis Journalism

words by Skyla Patton

My life changed when I started experiencing pain, like real pain, when I was about 13- which, if you’ve ever been a 13 year old cis-gendered girl, is the worst time for just about everything. On a vacation to Washington to visit family, the dreaded mother nature finally visited. My periods were horrific, and I learned quickly that while they are unpleasant for everyone, I had particularly bad luck. For the next several years, I suffered through one week a month where I could barely get out of bed because of the fire in my gut or missed whole days of school because my skin was so bloated and sensitive it hurt. The worst of all, though, was my breast pain – I couldn’t sleep if I wasn’t on my back, and the pain didn’t stop when my period did. It was there, all the time, every day. I had to wear heavy-duty sports bras to dull the pain down, couldn’t participate fully in PE and had to have special permissions to carry ibuprofen around in my backpack.

“You’ll be fine, sweetheart. Discomfort is normal for growing girls,” hummed my women’s doctor during one of our first appointments. This was far from the last time I heard these words. Practitioners across the board ensured me that my blistering breast pain was over-exaggerated and something I simply had to deal with, a curse of womanhood. For years of my life, I believed them; I suffered through the discomfort, I took the prescription medication and I pushed through yoga classes everyone swore would eliminate my pain.

I discovered cannabis several years after mother nature wreaked havoc on my bodily happiness. Growing up in a community that was heavily immersed in cannabis culture already, even in the early 2000s, it didn’t feel like an entirely alien path, but it was absolutely considered a leisure activity. I took my first puff in a way I imagine to be similar to everyone else’s: on a camping trip, surrounded by good friends and (luckily) a lot of delicious snacks. However, that first puff changed a part of me I will never forget: my aches faded, my mind relaxed and for the first time in years, my boobs took a chill pill. I slept on my side that night on my air mattress for the first time in over four years and it felt. so. good. Weeks later, a family friend offered me a CBD/THC combination salve, Rub by Whoopi and Maya (yes, the Whoopi Goldberg and Maya Elisabeth—shout out to powerful women in business), designed specifically for menstrual pain, and I was sold. The ability to live a day of my life without continual discomfort or constant thinking about that discomfort was an overwhelming feeling of relief and gratitude. I was not interested in letting this new freedom go: I was hooked on cannabis.

This introduction to cannabis was also my introduction to a culture and world that was so much more complex and interesting than passing a blunt around while watching Survivor. I immersed myself in the intricacies of the growers around me, the labor of love of gardening medicinal plants, and the varying differences between recreational and medical cannabis users. I have been a declared journalism major since the age of 8, and started writing for The Emerald in my freshman year after being connected by a friend. The neurons in my brain lit up when the idea of a cannabis magazine was brought up during our weekly meeting for Emerald Essentials; and thus, Green Eugene was born. This was an opportunity for me to connect my interest with cannabis culture to my passion for journalism, and I jumped on the pitch right away. Writing stories for Green Eugene opened up my mind to new possibilities and the massive potential that a cannabis magazine could have; I want to erase the stigma of cannabis use, enlighten the public and blaze the trail of cannabis journalism.

When I became a regular consumer of cannabis, the stigma of cannabis use pushed back, hard. I felt the harsh connotation of being a cannabis user: suddenly I was lazy, unmotivated. The door to other “hard” drugs had somehow magically opened through the gateway of smoking pot. These stigmas confused me as they were so different from the stoners I had grown up and interacted with; business owners, loving parents, talented artists and many more. I’ve been a proud and active member of Rotary International since the 6th grade, and suddenly I was fearful of these huge, older-generation role models in my life turning mutinous because of my choice of healing. The same Rotarians who insisted that their stereotype (stale, male and pale) was inaccurate (it is) continued to believe that the stereotypes about cannabis users were fact (they’re not). This tug-o-war of stereotypes hurt me and took years to overturn in my own mindset.

Stereotypes are harmful, inaccurate and oftentimes born out of a fear of the unknown, a fear of change. A huge goal of mine and many others in the cannabis industry is to push the stigma against reefer madness out of the limelight and replace it with a sentient of healing, growth and innovation. Cannabis  made me feel better, and that was a simple enough reason for me.

For all of the period-havers, young or otherwise, out there who are grappling with intense pain: your pain is not something you have to live with. Your doctor should listen to you when you say you hurt and they should not dismiss it because of your time of the month. Listen to your pain, seek out your answer (cannabis related or not) and do not take no for an answer during the pursuit of relief.

I live for producing this awesome publication for y’all, and it’s an honor to be able to share my story on a platform I’m so proud of. Cannabis, for me, was transformative, offering pain relief and the ability to live my life without daily discomfort. It was also a launchpad into a career that I love and truly feel I can stand behind. My hope is that other female-identifying ladies like me can learn to do the same: demand that the world believe your pain, push past stigmas that hold you back and use that same attitude to make a path for yourself. You can do it.
(Disclaimer: I was able to shrug off stereotypes and make it to where I am today due to my undeniable privilege as a white, middle class woman. Mass incarceration for cannabis possession, violence and discrimination affects people of color every day in our country and is being lost in the waves of legalization and commodification. We cannot endorse legalization without demanding decriminalization. Visit http://www.drugpolicy.org/issues/marijuana-legalization-and-regulation for information on decriminalization and how to get involved in your area.)

Budtender Spotlight: Katrina Johnston

How and when did you become a budtender?

I was in between a rock and a hard place, I was working mediocre jobs, and I realized, “Oh shoot, cannabis has been legal for almost a year now, what am I doing?” I got really ambitious from there. I called every single store in Eugene and asked who was hiring, but initially I did not get the job at Next Level. I was trained at The Greener Side, which is the oldest dispensary in Eugene, and the way that I was taught, numbers weren’t the focus. I was learning all about the growth process. I would spend hours cruising the computer, reading articles and talking to customers and vendors. When the industry was developing and there were so many unknowns, every day was a challenge because you had to learn how to package properly, how to hand it out and understand what weights were. But since cannabis law is always changing, there are new changes happening every 3 to 7 days, you don’t what law you might break so you have to be careful.

I was in between a rock and a hard place, I was working mediocre jobs, and I realized, “Oh shoot, cannabis has been legal for almost a year now, what am I doing?” I got really ambitious from there. I called every single store in Eugene and asked who was hiring, but initially I did not get the job at Next Level. I was trained at The Greener Side, which is the oldest dispensary in Eugene, and the way that I was taught, numbers weren’t the focus. I was learning all about the growth process. I would spend hours cruising the computer, reading articles and talking to customers and vendors. When the industry was developing and there were so many unknowns, every day was a challenge because you had to learn how to package properly, how to hand it out and understand what weights were. But since cannabis law is always changing, there are new changes happening every 3 to 7 days, you don’t what law you might break so you have to be careful.

What was it like the first time you got high?

The first time I got high, I smoked a homemade gravity bong, and I got blasted. I wasn’t scared at all, I was like this is cool — I was a much happier person. As a seasoned Oregonian, I also remember the first time I hit oil, we called it honey oil, and I remember I could not talk for 2 hours after that. When you’re young, you have all these other emotions going on and when you’re high on top of that and it can be a lot. I was young, but I was one of those people who had anxiety as a kid. I switched high schools and was having panic attacks every morning, and I ended up doing better in school after I found cannabis. It’s funny because I was an above and beyond student and I was so high a lot of the time. Cannabis is such a diverse product, that it’s not one size fits all. I’m one of those people who can do their coffee and their cannabis and then plow through shit.

How do you approach recommending a product to a customer?

That can be a really fun adventure simply because it’s an opportunity to learn. You ask yourself, what is this person like, and why might something work for them. You instantly go through your mind and think about every customer that’s been similar, so it’s like, cool, I’m in to learn something and they’re in to learn something. And it’s a win-win. We are experts simply because of our customers or else we would have nothing to gain. I have learned so many things about the world of cannabis through talking to people. I always want customers to come back and tell me how a product worked for them.

What do you look for in a strain?

It’s weird the different kinds of smells you look for depending on where you’re at in your life. Currently I absolutely love indicas. I’m looking for the body high, I’m looking to get out of my head. But I am a non-discriminate user because I believe more in the genetics effects rather than whether it’s an indica, sativa, or hybrid. Because there are so many different things going on with a plant, you can’t base your preferences off those categories because sometimes a super purple indica has me cleaning my entire fucking house. These are classification and scales that legal states have created, but there’s no universal measure, and that’s when budtending becomes really difficult.

Best part about budtending? Worst part?
Getting that real personal connection with a customer, whether it be enlightening someone who hasn’t done this before, finding something that works, or just finding someone who you connect with who wants to learn and have an open mind. And the downfall can be that so many people don’t take selling weed seriously. But learning acceptance in yourself and others is what has helped me not worry about that. Either you let it run you or you run it.

What do you think is special about Next Level Wellness?
Next Level Wellness is the best company I have worked with, and I’ve worked with plenty of other dispensaries. I wanted to work in a place where I had room to grow and Next Level is this diverse place that allows me to do that. They’re really involved in the community, they do all sorts of cool events that I get to be a part of.

Favorite way to consume?
If I didn’t have asthma, I prefer flower all day every day. The effects of a flower are just so pure that when you do all these other things with it, it gets lost. Right now, my favorite way to consume is edibles. I’ve been digging macarons.

What’s one stereotype about cannabis users that isn’t true?
Who uses cannabis. We’re having a lot of the elderly community come in, who grew up with Reefer Madness, asking what they can take in place of opioids for many reasons. It’s really amazing to be a part of that because you’ve opened somebody’s eyes to something that they would have never ever considered and it can help them. Selling weed is really fun, but working with people you know you know you’re helping is the whole fun.

What’s your favorite activity to do while high?

My favorite thing to do is a have a good conversation where everybody’s laughing. I like being comedic and doing improv and creating crazy stories with my brilliant friends. And there’s nothing better than laughing your hardest and purest. Everybody has their version of That 70’s Show that they remember, sitting in a circle with their friends — because you can’t not be in a circle. Stoners are always in a circle, man.

Favorite thing to munch on while high?
Typically candy always. But there is nothing better than a burrito. My favorite thing to do on my day off was what I call, Sundazed and Confused. Every Sunday I would get a burrito, watch Dazed and Confused, and get stoned.

What accessory or paraphernalia do you like to use?
This bong that has an electric nail that stays at a certain temperature all the time. That way you get a better flavor profile, and since I can’t smoke flower anymore, it allows me to get the full benefits from that plant. It makes me feel one step higher in the cannabis world.
When you’re not here, what might you be doing?
There’s nothing more that I enjoy in this world than making a meal for a group of people. I bake very well, and I also like cooking. Cannabis bring people together and so do meals. You’re required to just sit and enjoy your food and nobody strays away from that moment. You talk about life and you get to enjoy a meal.

Runner’s High

words by Josh Delzell
photos by Connor Cox

Lazy, dull and careless; all stereotypes to describe stoners.  While it can be nice to give in to couch lock and watch a movie, not all “potheads” are lazy, despite what cultural stigmas may have you believe. Many stay active, and while the science is still murky on whether or not cannabis is beneficial to an active lifestyle, many swear by it. Active runners have said that it helps them push through the pain of a workout because of the high. Former NBA player, Matt Barnes, swears by cannabis use. Barnes said “All my best games I was medicated,” in an interview by Bleacher Report for their B/R x 4/20 piece. While most professional athletes are still hesitant to discuss their cannabis use, recreational athletes can talk more candidly about their consumption. Take Ruben Estrada for instance.

Estrada, a senior at the University of Oregon, has been active for most of his life. “Running has been a hobby of mine for a while,” he said. “I’ve played soccer since I was kid.” Estrada tries to get in a strenuous workout at least three days a week, and he does this all while utilizing cannabis.  He declared that he smokes every day,— following up with a clarification that he typically doesn’t smoke before classes, but occasionally indulges in the classic wake and bake on weekends.

Estrada even used to actively run after a smoke sesh. “It depends on the strain,” he said. “But with a sativa, a two hour plus run, even when the high was coming down, I still felt a little boost to add onto the runner’s high.” Estrada reflected on competing in the last Eugene Marathon. “My parents kind of made me do it. They didn’t force me or anything, but they started to really get into fitness by the end of my high school career.” Estrada felt as if he was getting ‘lazy’ while his parents were whipping themselves into shape. “My dad ran the Portland marathon, and my mom ran the half. I was like ‘dang, they’re in their 40’s, I can do this too!’” Estrada also wanted to challenge the ‘pothead’ stereotype in a way. “It was fun taking a bong rip and following up with a two and half hour run, and thinking, ‘most people won’t do this.’”

Estrada wanted to push back against the stigma of cannabis being detrimental to an active lifestyle, when in reality, it’s more common than you’d think.  “There are so many people that use it, that are professionals and are active on a daily basis.” Despite connotations, some people use cannabis and still go for a run or hit the gym. “I ran a marathon, and there are a lot of people who don’t smoke cannabis that didn’t. So, you can laugh your way to the bank knowing you’re doing stuff others aren’t even when they doubt your lifestyle.”

Estrada unfortunately suffered a knee injury during the marathon. “It was the classic, ‘mile 22 will get ya’,” he said. He suffered an LCL injury, and is currently doing rehabilitation for his knee, but unfortunately doesn’t run as much as he used to. However, Estrada continues to use cannabis as a pain reliever for his knee. “It’s a great pain reliever, it relaxes the pain.” THC and CBD have many anti-inflammatory properties, which makes it an effective pain reliever for active lifestyles. THC also relaxes the nervous system which can help with muscle spasms.  “I work for UO Concessions, so I worked all the football games, and I would end up running around 10 to 12 miles a game,” he said. “So at the end of the day, my knee was pretty sore… cannabis made it easier to go to sleep without a nagging injury keeping me up.” Estrada uses cannabis infused topical cream for his knee. He likens these topicals to Icy Hot. “You can slap it on your knee, back, shoulders or anything. It’s a great soother and relaxer,” he said.

Despite the benefits that cannabis provides to athletic lifestyles, it is still banned in most high profile athletic events. The Olympics and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) lists cannabis as a performance enhancing drug, due to “having the potential to enhance sport performance” and “representing an actual or potential health risk to the athlete,” according to the USADA Marijuana FAQ page. However, according to a study done by the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, no evidence was found of cannabis being a performance enhancing drug. They even touched on the potential cannabis could have to help with traumatic brain injury after further research. “There is no science that says it’s a performance enhancing substance in the context that it gives you an unfair advantage,” said Estrada. “There are ex-NBA players that have come out saying they used it, and it was their saving grace [for their injuries]. I would like to see a time where people  start to understand and empathize with the medical benefits from it, because I see it as a really therapeutic substance.”

With evidence that indicates cannabis can help athletes, it remains banned by high level athletic competitions. Many stigmas about cannabis come from a lack of knowledge and experience. People like Estrada challenge old stigmas and show that cannabis doesn’t make one lazy; how you use cannabis is up to you and your personal lifestyle. While reflecting on his experience in the Eugene Marathon, Estrada left with an anecdote that sums up what it’s like being an athlete that uses cannabis: “At the marathon I was wearing a t-shirt that had a pot leaf on it, and at mile 20 when I was feeling it a little, there was a group of people and one of the guys yells ‘Yeah! Powered by weed!’ and that was a motivator!”

What’s Legal Now?

words by Bryan Dorn

The web of ever-changing laws around marijuana possession is complex, and can leave consumers who are unsure of local laws stuck finding out for themselves— in either a dispensary or a courtroom.

Following legalization in Oregon in 2014, cities and counties throughout the state could opt out of marijuana production and distribution according to Measure 91. Currently, 95 cities and counties across the state are currently on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission prohibition record, meaning they have banned some aspect of the industry, if not an outright ban. This means the biggest factor to be aware of as a consumer is where you are, and what the marijuana rules and regulations are.

Consumers in Lane County have access to dozens of dispensaries, but just 30 minutes south retail shops in Douglas County will be non existent.

Dispensaries weren’t allowed to sell marijuana in retail stores until 2015. Since 2016, the number of medical and recreational dispensaries in Oregon has grown to over 500, according to the OLCC active marijuana retail license list from October 2018.

Marijuana legalization has been a long journey, and laws are still changing at the regional, state and national levels. This has caused rapid change in local regulations such as purchasing amounts, smoking restrictions and possession limits. Consumers can expect more change as marijuana legalization, regulation and taxation begins to spread across the country.

As marijuana tip toes towards full legality, knowing local laws and regulations can help equip consumers with the right tools to make good decisions when leaving the house with marijuana or sparking up a joint.

Here are the basics on recreational marijuana possession in Eugene, according to the OLCC:

Possession at home according:
You must be 21 or older to legally, possess or consume marijuana
Landlords can restrict possession, consumption and cultivation of marijuana on their properties.
Eight ounces of usable marijuana such as dried leaves or flowers.
One ounce of cannabinoid extracts or concentrates.
16 ounces of cannabinoid product in solid form.
72 ounces of cannabinoid product in liquid form.

Possession in public:

According to the OLCC, a public place is any space where the public has open access—this includes places like highways, streets, schools, parks, front yards, and bar patios.

One ounce of usable marijuana
One ounce of cannabinoid extracts or concentrates.
16 ounces of cannabinoid product in solid form.
72 ounces of cannabinoid product in liquid form.
These limits mean that while consumers can possess up to eight ounces in their home, they can only leave their home with one ounce at a time.

Possession on campus, according to the Dean of Students:
Marijuana in any form is strictly prohibited on campus.
Riding a bike or driving any motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana is prohibited.
You may possess and use marijuana off campus if you are 21 and older.
If students are planning on going to or through campus they are not allowed to possess marijuana.

Cultivation Rules according to the OLCC:
Adults 21 and older are allowed 10 marijuana seeds.
4 mature plants per household—NOT per person.
4 immature plants in a public space for the sake of transportation.

Note: While eight ounces may sound like a lot of marijuana, households with four mature plants may easily produce more than that amount come harvest season. Adults in Oregon can give or exchange marijuana to anyone 21 and older so long as no financial compensation is directly or indirectly exchanged, according to the OLCC.

Financial compensation can be seen as any exchange of goods, including: services, tips, admissions, raffles, fundraisers, donations and more.

Places where possession law may vary:
Federal lands
Tribal lands
Leased properties; tenants should ask their landlord.

Transportation:
Consumers must follow all public space possession amounts when transporting marijuana.
It is legal to possess on flights within within the state under public possession limits.
It is not legal to transport marijuana across state lines.
It is only legal to transport one ounce of marijuana at a time.
You can only transport 4 immature marijuana plants at a time.

Consumption
Operating a bicycle or motor vehicle under the influence of marijuana is against the law.
Consumption is restricted to private spaces.
It is illegal to consume marijuana in public places such as parks, streets, schools, front yards etc.

Chugga Chugga, Let’s Get Trainwrecked: Strain of The Month

words by Skyla Patton

School has arrived with a bang, and suddenly we’re waist  deep in the craziness of fall term. Deadlines, new classes and the scramble for time has everyone feeling overwhelmed. Week two and already we want to retreat to bed waving a white flag. Don’t worry, it’s not time to burn your syllabi and throw in the towel yet. Relaxing with a half gram of hybrid is a great way to ease your mind and take a well-deserved break: Trainwreck is here to take you away.

Famous in the marijuana world, Trainwreck is a tasty, sativa-heavy hybrid that lives up to its name. Almost instantaneously, a  euphoria of motivation and uplifted energy hits you (you guessed it, like a train). This insta-high is a unique quality that is not typically found in most hybrids. Trainwreck is the bubbly love child of Afghani indicas and Thai or Mexican sativas.Their happy marriage creates a powerful high that can sustain you through those deadlines while steamrolling any extra stress or tension. This strain is ideal for a cool autumn walk, spicing up date night or adding inspiration to a creativity sesh. Trainwreck is pretty much a big snuggly hug  — are you sold yet?

A Northern California native, this hybrid has an earthy, almost minty aroma with a slight hint of lemon. At first glance it may just look like your average bud, but a microscope will reveal fiery orange stigmas (the little fuzzy hairs) and deep specks of purple hidden close to the stem. Trainwreck is highly renowned for its incredible uplifting qualities and is often used to treat PTSD, common anxiety or chronic pain.

The high will allow you to relax and forget your worries without totally incapacitating you to your netflix— unless that’s where you want to be. It also is known to help with a lack of appetite or stomach nausea. Be prepared for the after effects, though: this strain burns quickly and effectively for a long-lasting high. Reports say that once the euphoria trickles away, you will be ready for pajamas and the best nap of your life.

 

Exceptional Edibles: Gourmet Treats For Your Next “Retreat”

words by Anna Glavash | photo by Trevor Meyer

It’s important to know cannabinoid profiles when choosing between the different types of edibles out there. Some are THC-dominant, others are all CBD and some contain both, with 1:1 ratios or a variety of other proportions.

When most of us think of edible cannabis, we think of the psychoactive effects of THC. But there are many other ways CBD, a non-intoxicating, therapeutic cannabinoid can behave in the body. We visited Moss Crossing, recent winner of best dispensary in Eugene Weekly, and talked to edibles cannasseur and budtender Jessie Daher about her favorites and when to eat them.

“For me, getting into edibles was the key to unlocking a better lifestyle and quality of life in general. I had severe insomnia for years that was feeding into other chronic pain issues. Once I got that handled, I realized what deep sleep felt like. Now I use edibles every night,” says Daher. So how can we know what to expect from these different products? “1:1 products are amazing for insomnia and chronic pain. THC and CBD work together synergistically to promote relaxation and healing in the body. You can’t go wrong. CBD in particular is preventative, and a lot of people don’t realize that. They think CBD is just to treat a problem. It’s actually better to prevent one. It’s one good way to lower inflammation and decrease cortisol [a stress hormone] in the body long term,” says Daher.

Retreats CBD Gummies by Willamette Valley Alchemy (Eugene) $19

  • CBD
  • 3 gummies per package
  • 24 mg CBD, 1 mg THC per gummy

These tropical gems are nothing like Haribo Bears. Made by hand right here in Eugene with real fruit purees and no artificial ingredients, they come in passionfruit, grapefruit, and strawberry flavors with blueberry launching soon. Retreats are “one of the strongest CBD edible products out there. They’re great if you tend toward anxiety or want to prevent inflammation,” Daher says. There’s also a THC version if you want psychoactive effects. Each batch is strain-specific, kind of like a single-origin coffee or chocolate bar, except Retreats uses locally-grown flower.

Mr. Moxey’s Mints CBD Herbal Pastilles by botanicaPORTLAND (Portland) $30

  • 5:1 CBD : THC
  • 20 Mints per tin
  • 5 mg CBD : 1 mg THC per mint

For the proper people. “Not only are they discreet, easy to take with you and tasty, you’re not going to have the psychoactive effects either.” These are perfect thing if you’re a microdoser and want to pop one or two at the end of your long day to unwind. With a 5:1 mg ratio of CBD:THC, the effects are very subtle. Mr. Moxey’s Mints won first place in the 2017 Dope Cup for the CBD Edible category. Find out why.

Junk Marshmallow Bon-Bons by Leif Goods (Portland) $24

  • 3:2 CBD : THC
  • 9.4 mg CBD : 6.8mg THC per bon-bon
  • 6 bon-bons per box

Vegan marshmallows. Covered in chocolate. Topped with chocolate salt. Yes, the salt is infused with chocolate. Far from junk, these are the ultimate indulgence. The near-equal ratio in this product makes it a favorite among those with complex medical issues, but it’s also great for anybody looking for a balanced high.

Leif Goods Peanut Butter & Jelly Organic Chocolate Bar $24

  • 1:1 THC : CBD
  • 42 mg THC, 47mg CBD per bar
  • 10 servings

The golden ratio (and maybe the golden ticket too) can be found in this chocolate bar. It’s truly amazing how much it tastes like a PB&J sandwich. The secret is the strawberry powder sprinkled on top. Chocolate is also a quick way to get results. “It’s a vasodilator, so it helps your system absorb the cannabinoids a lot faster,” Daher explains.

Cinnamon Maca Almond Butter by Lux (Bend) $17/27

  • THC
  • 500 mg per jar
  • Available in a 6.5 oz or a 1.27 oz. jar

Want to keep the good times rolling on a backpacking trip? Just toss this jar in your bag. With a malty, butterscotch flavor, Maca is a powdered root. According to Lux, the Incas used it for strength and stamina, and this THC formula will make your hike all the more enjoyable. Imagine cookie butter that tastes like graham crackers, but good for you. Yes, you can consider this a health food. Lux already took home first place for Sweet Edible in the 2017 Dope Cup. It’s delicious right off the spoon, or if you’re snacking, why not add some to sliced apples or toast, or drizzle on a smoothie or granola bowl. Though it’s tempting, we don’t recommend eating the whole jar.

Piqmiup Tea in Lemon & Jasmine Harmony Sativa Blend by Upward Cannabis Kitchen (Portland, OR) $14

  • THC
  • 5 mg each
  • 3 tea bags

There’s not much a cup of tea can’t cure. Daher says these are another good option for microdosing and a good way to get THC into your system quickly. Piqmiup comes in several blends including indica and hybrid. They’re made with looseleaf tea, other herbs like lavender and cannabis distillate, which is flavorless. Sativas are more energizing, indicas are calming, and a hybrid is, well, somewhere in between.

Magic Number Ginger Beer (Bend) $5/$7/$9

  • THC
  • 3, 10, or 25 mg per 12 oz. bottle

Daher says people can’t get enough of these drinks, which are a favorite among the edibles crowd. Why? Because they’re super affordable and get into your system a bit faster. What’s not to love? The best part is that the mg marks on the 25mg bottle show you where to stop drinking to control your dose. We’ve heard these make amazing floats, and yes, Moss also sells medicated ice cream. Cheers!

Eugene’s Best Glass Shops

by Anya Caro and Sierra Pedro | photo by Benji Rothenberg

While we all have a preferred smoking method, glassware is a must-have for many marijuana users. After deciding which strain to use, the second important decision is the method of consumption. Lucky for us, Eugene has plenty of local glass shops, also known as head shops. These shops will help you make the best purchase for your weed needs. Several of the glass shops around town are locally-owned and dedicated to their practice, able to provide for each smoker’s preferences. No matter your price range or consumption preference, there’s a glassware shop nearby to help you out.

Cornerstone

443 E 13th Ave. / 541-844-1585 / Mon. – Sat. 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Sun. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Conveniently right down the street from campus is Cornerstone, a perfect stop for glass products. They have a wide array of affordable glass pipes in various arrangements, colors and sizes. They also promote local glassblowers work, which feature various colors and eccentric designs. Cornerstone’s water pipes come in all sorts of bright colors, and if you want to shed just a few extra dollars, their higher-up water pipe designs are another great option for inhalers.

Santa Clara Smoke Shop

664 River Rd. / 541-654-5772 / Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Sun. 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Santa Clara Smoke Shop uses products from over 30 different local glass blowers. Their products are constantly changing due to changes in the artists who provide for them. So if you want something unique and one of a kind, stop by Santa Clara for something specifically “you.”  They have hand pipes, water pipes, bowls, downstems and concentrate accessories. Santa Clara also has the widest selection of vape products and juice in the area. They exclusively carry Emerald vapors, simplifying your need to decipher the differences between various vape products.

Midtown

133 E 13th Ave.  / 541-345-3337 / Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m – 9 p.m. and Sun. 11 a.m – 8 p.m.

Midtown sells locally made water pipes, bubblers, e-pens, dry pipes, concentrate supplies, vapor domes, vapor rigs, oil rigs and glass accessories. They sell a variety of products from local artists and top name brands. Every week, they have new pieces and provide new selections. They promote unique and top selling products that stand out among the crowd of glass shops in Eugene. You can’t find their unique products anywhere else.

Hunky Dory

271 W 7th Ave. / 541-345-1853 / Mon. – Sat. 10a.m. – 8p.m. and Sun. 12p.m. – 6p.m.

Hunky Dory is arguably known for being students’ favorite glass shop, right down the road from the university. They offer a wide selection of products and price ranges for any cannabis user. From hookah accessories to vaporizers to books and other products, they have it all! They also offer Miss Mary Jane leggings and Honey House Natural products.

Sweet Tooth Glass

3815 W 11th Ave. Ste 100 / 541-345-7777 / Mon. – Fri. 10:30a.m. – 7p.m., Sat. 12p.m. – 6p.m. and Sun. 12:30p.m. – 5p.m.

If you’re looking to support a small town, local business — look no further than Sweet Tooth Glass! They offer local handmade products from glass blowers Schott, Glass Alchemy, Northstar and Blast Shield. They also have a bench rental station for local artists and/or glassblowers to use!