Strain of The Month: Cantaloupe Haze

Written and photographed by Noah Noteboom

As you sit in your room listening to the rain hit the roof, you find yourself craving something to do. With the weather taking a turn for the worst, staying indoors is probably a good idea. Autumn gives us the opportunity to huddle around the fire or catch up on those movies we have stashed away for rainy days. But movies like Hocus Pocus, Good Will Hunting or The Nightmare Before Christmas can only provide entertainment for so long, before you need something else to do.

That is where our Strain of the Month comes into play. Cantaloupe Haze (also spelled as Cannalope Haze) takes the honor this month. Although low in CBD, this flower more than makes up for it with earthy smells and a higher concentration of THC.

This indica-dominant strain is a mix of Mexican and Haze Brothers to create a blend of cannabis that is meant to uplift the spirits and soothe your mind. Cantaloupe Haze can be a sweet relief from the seasonal sadness that often comes with the change in weather.

The fruity flower has a very potent aroma. The smell of flowers and tropical sweets romance you, and the earthy nugs have a similar taste as well. As you indulge, you can taste hints of sweet and sour melons along with a slight whiff of pine in the aftertaste. 

With THC levels ranging anywhere from 20-28%, use caution when smoking this strain. It is recommended that newer users consume smaller doses and with lots of patience to avoid couch-lock. As with most indica strains, the amount you intake has a direct impact on the weight of the effects. Smoking just the right amount will make getting things done a breeze. But be careful, because if taken in excess, this strain will leave you feeling sleepy and unmotivated.

Especially in the current condition of the world, Cantaloupe Haze offers a big morale boost. Quarantine will feel a little less claustrophobic and a bit brighter with this mellow, productive strain guiding you through the day. 

Customer’s Guide to Cannabis

written by Alexandra Arnett

The Cannabis sativa L. species is a member of the family Cannabaceae. Around 27.8 million years ago, a split occurred within the Cannabacea family developing into Cannabis L. and Humulus L. Cannabis has been used for thousands of years either as medicine, food, for fibers and even in religious ceremonies. Many of the early reports of cannabis use indicate it can cause psychosis-like symptoms, including visions, but this is extremely speculative as it was mostly observed in religious ceremonies and/or ritual practices. 

Though the Cannabis sativa L. species has been around for over 10,000 years, botanical and chemical research and classification of the plant has only occurred within the last few centuries. 

 The “L” indicates who first published the classifications, and in the case of cannabis and Humulus, or hops, it is Carl Linnaeus. Linnaeus is also considered the Father of Taxonomy and published Systema Naturae in which he classified over 7,700 plant species.

Now, when cannabis was first classified and popularized in the early 60s, it was mistakenly noted that “indica” and “sativa” were relevant in terms of the physiological and psychological effects. However, this was never indicated by those using cannabis and the botanists certainly were not ingesting them to find out. This is where the confusion really sets in; with the re-popularization of cannabis in the early 90s, the terms indica and sativa were suddenly being used to describe effect rather than morphology and origin. These terms have no bearing on how a certain strain will make you feel. Instead, the chemical makeup of terpenes is what influences the effect of a certain strain. 

The term “sativa” is Latin for cultivated, which is why it was used to name the variety of the Cannabis L. species Cannabis sativa. The term “indica” was for the region, India, in which they first found a specific variety of the species. Cannabis L. contains two main varieties, Cannabis sativa subsp. sativa and Cannabis sativa subsp. indica. Furthermore, within these subspecies, there are several varieties:

  • Cannabis sativa subsp. sativa var. sativa (Broad-leaf hemp or BLH)
  • Cannabis sativa subsp. sativa var. chinesis (Narrow-leaf hemp or NLH)
  • Cannabis sativa subsp. indica var. indica (Narrow-leaf drug or NLD)
  • Cannabis sativa subsp. indica var. afghanica (Broad-leaf drug or BLD)

Cannabis sativa subsp. sativa varieties are what we call hemp, which is simply cannabis with a lower THC content, and is better for crafting fibers and other materials. Cannabis sativa subsp. indica varieties account for the “drug” types that helped develop the cannabis we have today. However, this is not to say that these four varieties never crossed paths and mixed genetics. If isolation of the plant varieties were the case, we would not have the cannabis we have today with the varying ratios of cannabinoids and terpenes. 

In today’s market, most cannabis “strains,” or cultivars as the scientific community likes to say, are hybrids of the various cannabis genetics. Landrace strains are another variety of cultivars that have not been crossed with any other genetics since its discovery. Due to the perseverance of some breeders and activists such as Ed Rosenthal and seed banks such as Sensi Seeds, strains that are considered “landrace” are available nearly everywhere. One of the most popular landrace strains is Durban Poison, which hails from the Port of Durban in Africa. Others include Hindu Kush, Afghan Kush, Lamb’s Bread, Acapulco Gold, Nepalese Kush and Chocolate Thai. These landrace strains have been cultivated by the native populations and have been used for centuries. Many of these landrace strains are best grown in climates similar to their place of origin. This can be achieved through indoor and greenhouse grows if the outdoor climate is not ideal for that particular strain.

In order to obtain the cannabis we have today, breeders have been crossing genetics and developing a wide array of strains, each with their own unique profile. Cannabis profiles include cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids. There are over 113 cannabinoids, including THC, CBD, CBN, CBG, THCV, CBDV and now THCP and CBDP. Various cannabinoids play a role in the psychological and physiological effects of cannabis. In addition, there are over 200 terpenes that can be found in cannabis. Terpenes contribute to the scent, effect, look and taste of cannabis. Flavonoids found in the cannabis plant include cannflavin A, cannflavin B, cannflavin C, vitexin, isovitexin, apigenin, kaempferol, quercetin, luteolin and orientin. These flavonoids contribute to the colors and tastes of the cannabis plant to create the combinations that we are familiar with. For example, the purple color that certain cannabis strains produce is due to a flavonoid called anthocyanin! In addition, this flavonoid is an anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and antioxidant.

Overall, one should not rely solely on cannabinoids or strain names to help determine what strain is best for them. The best test is the smell test: your nose knows better. The more you enjoy the scent of a cannabis strain, the more likely you are to enjoy the effect. Although, be aware that high THC content and certain terpenes such as pinene and terpinolene can cause anxiety. Training your nose to sniff out those terpenes can help you choose the strain with little to none of those terpenes. Pinene has a scent like pine while terpinolene has a gassy/tart scent. 

References

McPartland, J. M. (2018). Cannabis Systematics at the Levels of Family, Genus, and Species. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 3(1), 203–212. https://doi.org/10.1089/can.2018.0039

A Literal Sleeper: Purple Hindu Kush

words by Julio Jaquez

A cross between Hindu Kush and Purple Afghani, two infamous strains that hail from the mountainous ranges that divide Afghanistan and Pakistan, emerged the beauty we know as Purple Hindu Kush. Nearly identical to its parental lineage, Purple Hindu Kush provides a sense of relaxation that rids the body of any stressors in the mind. The dense, spongy and frosted flower is glittered with trichomes and it’s orange pistils are accentuated by the lavender color that is spread throughout the bud. Reminiscent of an Oregon winery, its sour pungent aroma is paired perfectly with an earthy-like taste or rich flavors, like dark chocolate.

Recognized and well-known, the specific variety that is Kush is often associated with its roots and reputation for a heavy kick. The origins of Kush cannabis produce a kind of high that is distinct and powerful. Strains intermingled with Kush are known for their potency and play a big role in the well known “couch lock effect”. Labeled a Top 10 Kush by High Times in 2016, Purple Hindu Kush is sure to relax you beyond belief. Be prepared to be soothed and lulled into a sweet state of calm. If you tend to be anxious, this strain will help you to wave goodbye to all of your worries. With the potential to derail an entire day,  Purple Hindu Kush earns our “Strain of the Month” recognition for March.

In 2009, Republican Congressman Mark Kirk of Illinois noticed the zombie-like effects it had and proposed a bill to increase criminal penalties when referencing to the infamous Kush strain — a testament to how intense it’s effects can be. Although it (probably) won’t turn you into a zombie, Purple Hindu Kush is not a strain to mess around with if something needs to be accomplished. This indica is destined to be paired with finally arriving home after a long day, unwinding and unstrapping those anxiety-induced bootstraps. So go home, find the best spot to sink in on the couch, and light up with this relaxation station: Purple Hindu Kush.

Quiz: Which Strain Are You?

It’s Saturday: are you getting ready to celebrate the weekend, or prepping the snacks for Netflix and chill?

Celebrate: Would your friends say you’re the life of the party, or more of the “mom friend”?

  • Life of the party: Munchies – hard pass, or give you all the snacks?
    • Oh my gosh, I’m starving: Indica
    • No thanks: Sativa
  • Mom friend: What’s your ideal way to unwind?
    • A nice drink on ice: Hybrid
    • A solid afternoon nap: Indica

Netflix: When you’re high, what’s your go-to activity?

  • Clean the whole house: What’s your preferred smoking tool to use?
    • Bong/pipe rip the best: Hybrid
    • Joints are the only way: Sativa
  • Watch ALL the TV: What tunes are always playing during your smoke sesh?
    • Rock and roll, dude: Sativa
    • Acoustic, something mellow: Indica

Sativa: You like to take a few puffs, and then go get stuff done – you’re a sativa! Smoking is a quick pick-me-up for you to really feel accomplished and carpe all the diems. You’ll be caught organizing the kitchen or doing some homework with strains like Sour Diesel, Green Crack, and Alaskan Thunder.

Indica: It’s time to just, like, totally chill out bro – you’re an indica. Smoking with you is all about laying back, relaxing, and having a good snack bowl ready to go. The weekend is finally here and your pre-rolled joints and Netflix queue can’t wait to get started. Indicas can be found inventing new food combos and napping with strains like Northern Lights, Purple OG Kush, and Afghani.

Hybrid: Not too hot, and not too cold – you’re a hybrid. You don’t wanna feel like you have too many responsibilities, but lazing the day away isn’t quite your style either. Take a good rip, relax a little bit, and enjoy the day with a nice high. Catch hybrids writing in their journal or taking a walk through the park with strains like White Widow, Pineapple Express, and Ghost OG.